Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I previewed a white paper talking about the development of the new Kappa 1.6 and it quotes this:

"To minimize friction: 2-stage oil pump, low viscosity engine oil (0w20) and low friction coating of the piston-ring and main bearing"

Having said that, I know the engine is rated for 5w30, but is that dino oil? That is non-synthetic? I know the new Prius is rated for 0w20 synthetic and I presume it's a safe bet to run it in the Ioniq.

Thoughts? Opinions?

Thanks!

Erik
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
Both the Ioniq and Niro get 0w-20 exclusively in the US so I'm sure that grade is OK. Regarding synthetic or dino, the new API SN, ILSAC GF5 and GF6 oils have such demanding high-temperature specs that they all need some percentage of group III or better basestocks to earn the designation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
776 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
denunz5,


Don't know if that was a joke or what, but you'd better go back to that dealer and demand the proper viscosity!

Ow50 is much too heavy an oil for the Ioniq. Especially for the Northeast at this time of year.

How do you know that that is what they put in? Did you see the container? Did they tell you that? Did they write it on the service papers?

I think you'd better go back and investigate.

G.W.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
776 Posts
denunz5,


Don't know if that was a joke or what, but you'd better go back to that dealer and demand the proper viscosity!

Ow50 is much too heavy an oil for the Ioniq. Especially for the Northeast at this time of year.

How do you know that that is what they put in? Did you see the container? Did they tell you that? Did they write it on the service papers?

I think you'd better go back and investigate.

G.W.
OMG, why oh why are people always so stubborn not to follow the maintenance guidelines in the user manual.
Apparently this guy has not a clue where these figures stand for. The prescribed oil viscosity for the Ioniq is 5W30. You can buy it at any good tankshop. Dont use anything else in order not to wreck your engine, blow your factory guarantee and make a terrible fool of yourself. Your dealer has pulled your leg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
My dealer filled with 0w20 also, as specified in our North American manuals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,843 Posts
Most of us would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between 5w and 0w at the colder end of the scale. However, either weight (0w20 or 5w30) nearly always indicates a fully synthetic oil.

The significant difference can be service change intervals. a lighter oil needs replacing more often - hence the 10,000 mile service intervals as that is what I expect for 0w20, and they just keep it the same for 5w30. Ow is a more recent introduction that services the needs of stop/start engines which actually spend a good proportion of time outside the `normal` operating temperatures, particularly in colder climates.

A 0w50 is NOT suitable for these engines and should be changed immediately. And the dealer reported to Hyundai is they're a franchise as they may cause harm. the second number is an indicator of the oil's viscosity at normal operating temperature, and as no 50w oils are recommended it should NEVER have been introduced in the first place...

Denunz5, your dealer is a cretin. I would insist on a full oil, filter change and flush, and then change your dealer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
All power plants are built the same no matter where in the world you live
These engines are built with a tight tolerance to improve fuel economy
That is why they recommend 20w oil
30w is too thick and could damage the power plant
In Europe they might use engine oil manufactured to metric specs where here in the USA we use regular non metric specs
There is e me a tighter tolerance power plant being developed right now that uses 16w oil.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,252 Posts
my understanding was the lower first number was based on predicted climate so when the engine was started from cold the oil is thin enough to alloy it to flow and not require excessive power to turn the engine over, and the higher 2nd number was so that at operating temperature the oil is thick enough to lubricate the engine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,044 Posts
my understanding was the lower first number was based on predicted climate so when the engine was started from cold the oil is thin enough to alloy it to flow and not require excessive power to turn the engine over, and the higher 2nd number was so that at operating temperature the oil is thick enough to lubricate the engine
This explains Viscosity :- SAE viscosity grades ? viscosity table and viscosity chart
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Regarding the oil changes, my manual also listed 0W20. If that is basically a synthetic based oil, then why on earth is the manual bringing up oil changes every 3750 miles for some conditions? I have no idea why the Prius harsh condition changes is 5000 miles, and normal change is 10,000 miles (per Toyota); and Hyundai has other ideas for really the same setup from at least the gas engine perspective. What am I missing here? I am under the impression that the Ioniq would do just fine with the same oil change intervals as the Prius would given the 0W20 (basically synthetic) requirement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,843 Posts
Regarding the oil changes, my manual also listed 0W20. If that is basically a synthetic based oil, then why on earth is the manual bringing up oil changes every 3750 miles for some conditions? I have no idea why the Prius harsh condition changes is 5000 miles, and normal change is 10,000 miles (per Toyota); and Hyundai has other ideas for really the same setup from at least the gas engine perspective. What am I missing here? I am under the impression that the Ioniq would do just fine with the same oil change intervals as the Prius would given the 0W20 (basically synthetic) requirement.
It's because the manufacturer has you by the balls with regard to warranty compliance.

I've run SMART cars to over 60,000 miles with the same synthetic oil and only filter changes and even in a 660cc turbo petrol car when sent for analysis it was, literally, as good as new. I used to do oil testing for lubricant companies on motorcycles and despite revving to 17,000 rpm and specific output more than DOUBLE the performance of our hybrid (600cc engine - 120 bhp - 200 bhp/litre; 1.6 litre ICE - 104 bhp - 65 bhp/litre) we regularly went 30,000 miles between oil changes with no appreciable deterioration.

A low-stressed Atkinson cycle engine you could do 30,000 miles or more perfectly safely - but then your dealer would never see you and that's not good for them, which is a higher level of priority for Hyundai than keeping us, the customer, happy.

Hence the time OR mileage requirement...
 
  • Like
Reactions: yticolev
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top