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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems that most of the posts here so far are from Europe, Australia, Korea, etc.--places where the Ioniq is already available or very close. That makes sense, and there's still a lot of great, useful information posted.

But I'm in the U.S., and I wonder if anyone else out there is also in the States and anxiously awaiting the arrival of the Ioniq.

Anyone?
 

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Welcome SundayT


there are a number of members on here from stateside, all watching and waiting for the Ioniq to appear


I believe the release date your side of the pond is similar to ours here in the UK (13th October) for the hybrid and electric models , with the plug-in hybrid due Q2 2017 (from what I have heard May / June)


I had a look at a Kia Niro yesterday, but not impressed with it


just hoping the Ioniq lives up to the hype we it arrives, if not I have to start looking all over again
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, bluecar1.

The best info I've gotten from a dealer in my area (far West Texas) is that the Ioniq will be available to order in late November. It may well be sooner than that in larger metro markets. Of course, that doesn't say that any will be available around then on dealer lots to test drive. As much as I like what I've read about the car, I'd never buy one without a test drive. So I may be looking at a couple of months past November before they start to show up on the lots.

I'm looking to replace an '04 Prius, which has been a great car with zero issues in 12 years and 80,000 miles, but I just can't force myself to buy a new Prius because it's so ugly, inside and out. I've looked at the Chevy Volt, Hyundai Sonata Hybrid and Kia Optima Hybrid, but none of them are exactly what I'm looking for. The Ioniq looks perfect for me on paper, so my hopes for it are really high.

I'm like you in that, if the Ioniq doesn't live up to the hype, I'm back to square one.

In the meantime, I hope to find out some details by lurking here, such as whether it comes with a temporary spare tire rather than an inflation kit, what colors are available, how the option packages stack up, etc. It should be an interesting and informative few months coming up...
 

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if you have a look at https://www.hyundaiusa.com/ioniq about 80% down the page you will see the specs for the 3 variants


there tends to be very few options as the models are pretty loaded with tech a standard, this has the advantage of virtually no lead times for cars but you get what you see


USA seems to be behind Europe for the release dates


UK
Hybrid 13th October
Electric 13th October (but only to 25-30 dealers)
Plug-in hybrid and release of electric to all dealers Q2 2017


USA
Electric I the Fall
Hybrid winter
plug-in hybrid next summer




from the information I have seen it is the inflation kit / can of goo, with no spare tyre option


there are 6 colours
It is available in 6 different exterior colours; Polar White, Phantom Black, Platinum Silver, Marina Blue, Phoenix Orange and exclusively for IONIQ Electric, Blazing Yellow. The lava stone interior trim features copper accents for the electric and blue for the hybrid models throughout the cabin and control surfaces.
more information (although not US spec) at http://www.hyundaipressoffice.co.uk/release/783/ & http://www.hyundai.co.uk/ioniq-pricing/ioniq_my16_july_2016-2.pdf and a brochure (Austrian) http://www.hyundai.at/hyundai.at/files/89/89c1eea8-ab95-4488-b03b-b5ae86a2ded5.pdf


this will give you a lot of the missing info,


only things that I think are missing is no option for towing, no option I have seen for spare wheel, not sure if you would be able to order one as an option or accessory as those details have not been released yet
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks a lot, bluecar1.

You're really on top of the situation! Thanks so much for the info and references.

Cheers!
 

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sundayt,

I'm right there with you. In my case, we have a 2006 Prius with 180K miles. So far, the car itself is holding up much better than my key fob which is hardly even recognizable as a key fob anymore.

I think we had always assumed we would get another Prius, but now that we are in the market for a replacement... just ugly. I'm so mad at Toyota for doing that really, because except for the styling, I would have loved the 2016 Prius. Well, actually, I would have loved a Tesla 3, but as a 4-person + dog family the lack of hatchback was a dealbreaker. With grandma and grandpa 180 mi away and the range limitation may have been as well.

For Ioniq, there have been two bits of info I have been waiting on. One is trunk space on the electric/plug-in (again, with family needs in mind). I had seen various bits on conflicting info, but until today the most consistent is that the electric/plug-in have ~3ft less. But none of the reviews seemed to be confirming that or showing the trunk on anything except the hybrid. Well suddenly today, I saw US specs appear to be available and also a picture of the trunk of the electric in this foreign review. I actually can't tell that it is smaller in that pic.

The other bit I've been waiting on is the US pricing, particularly the plug-in pricing. If I can get my wife to wait that long, I love the idea of having 80% of the miles on the car being electric. But only if the plug-in with tax incentives keep it competitive with a standard hybrid. Hints from articles on European pricing have are promising, but I'm guessing I still have a ways to wait on the US plug-in price.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Maui,

Yeah, I also initially just "assumed" I'd buy a new Prius to replace my old one, but Toyota shot itself in the foot from my perspective by ruining the styling so badly. I've read that current Prius sales are down about 20% over last year. Pundits place the "blame" for that on low gas prices, but I've gotta believe the ugliness of the car turns off a LOT of potential buyers, including those like you and me who are already satisfied Prius owners and for whom buying a new one SHOULD be a no-brainer.

I encourage you to also check out the Chevy Volt. I had one on an overnight test drive a few weeks ago, and liked it a lot. However, I found out that I'm not really a plug-in kinda guy, plus I'm dubious about GM quality and reliability. But I really do like the idea of being able to do virtually all of my around-town errands on electricity only. A Volt might work out well for you.

One of the reasons I like what I see about the Ioniq is that the cargo area, with the rear seats folded down, LOOKS like it's relatively flat and reasonably long. For me, it's not so much the number of cubic feet of trunk space that matters, it's the shape of that area. My wife and I enjoy car-camping, and we often sleep in the back of the car if we don't want to pitch a tent. Our current Prius is great for that. With the new Prius (which we also had on an overnight test drive recently), that would work only in certain trim levels, because the versions without a temporary spare tire have a three-inch hump in the cargo area floor. Ouch!

I've read that the Ioniq doesn't use a conventional 12-volt battery but instead taps part of the high-voltage battery for accessory power, etc. But a video overview that I've seen clearly shows a 12-volt battery in a compartment at the right rear of the trunk in the hybrid version. I suspect the lack of a 12-volt may be just in the electric and/or plug-in versions. I don't see the battery access door in the picture of the electric that you mentioned.

Also, a UK spec sheet that I've seen specifies a temporary spare tire, but, again, the video I saw clearly shows one of those useless tire inflation kits under the trunk floor and no spare. I understand Hyundai dealers can install spare tire kits in cars that come without them, but I don't know if that'll apply to the Ioniq or not.

Back to anxiously watching and waiting...
 

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Still surprised I haven't seen anything mentioned about a supercapacitor since that's the next step in these cars. Hopefully with the way the Ioniq is made there some hint of a supercap happening, if not it might just turn out being a mid-production cycle refresh sort of thing.
 

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curiosity


what sort of MPG you guys getting from your prius? and is that mainly city or highway driving?


I am curious as to how the new Ioniq compares to prius, on paper the new prius has it by about 10%


UK mpg for the new prius is about 94MPG, an the Ioniq is 83mpg , that converts to about 76mpg and 63mpg in US gallons


EPA mpg both seem to be similar from what I am seeing
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, bluecar1, the first thing I have to say is that there is obviously a measurement and/or calculational difference between UK and US MPG calculations.

In the US, MPG ratings are statute miles (5,280 feet) divided by gallons of gas (one gallon being four quarts). With those units of measurement, my lifetime calculated MPG is 49.4 MPG under a random mix of city and highway driving (if I use the display in the car, the average is 50.0 MPG). I've gotten as high as 89 MPG and as low as 30 MPG on different fill-ups. That's based on 80,000 miles of data.

So I can't imagine where in the world a UK rating of 94 MPG comes from, but it obviously uses utterly different units of measure or something. Can you shed any light on how its figured? I suspect you use Imperial gallons, but that's not enough to make such a huge difference. Even your 76 MPG is nowhere near the US rating, nor is it close to what I and other US Prius owners get in real life.

As Mark Twain or someone equally literate once said, "England and America are two countries divided by a common language."
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
bluecar1,

It looks some of the difference is in the government ratings, because the European and US test loops to determine fuel consumption are apparently quite different. Real-world performance must be very different than the ratings in Europe, while it seems quite close to the ratings in the US. I mean, I can't believe anyone in England drives a Prius and gets 94, or even 76, MPG on a regular basis, even if the fuel quantity is measured in Imperial gallons. But maybe I'm wrong about that.

The average for many, many US Prius owners on Fuel Economy is 47.4 MPG, and the 2004 Prius is rated at 46 MPG combined, so it looks like most people get better mileage than the rated number, as I do.

I'd still like to understand the difference in detail.
 

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a UK gallon is about 1.2 US gallons, our gallon is 4.54 litres if that helps


that is the biggest real difference,


our "official" mpg test are not relevant to real world and as you can see from the VW diesel scandal the manufacturers manipulate the tests to lesser or greater extent , your EPA test seem to be much closer to real world
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
bluecar1,

According to a handy-dandy on-line converter that I found, my 49.4 MPG lifetime average converts to 59.3 MPG in UK units. That's still not even close to the ratings that you quoted, so clearly something else is going on, because I know my mileage is very typical of US Prius owners.
 

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our test are done with everything optimised, tyre pressures at max, minimal fuel , minimum weight, everything possible turned off that could take power / fuel (heater, aircon, blower, lights etc)


there are moves to update it but surprisingly manufacturers seem to be delaying things that make there cars look less economical


we have an urban which is supposed to simulate stop / start town driving and extra urban motorway / highway driving, then combined is a combination of the two


I tend to find urban is realistic average driving, combined is achievable if you drive live a little old lady at 56-60 mph on motorway where the limit is 70


my i20 has official UK figures of urban 47.1, combined 58.9 ad extra urban 68.9


if you look at my fuelly figures my average since owning is 49.1, but my last five average is about 55mpg (yes I do drive like a granny, too many speed camera's here) so I am hoping to get good mpg with the Ioniq


on my trip computer I have seen 78mpg on 70 mile run on motorway, my trip computer is about 5% optimistic so that one run I really managed about 71-72mpg but normally see 62-68mpg on that run (57-62mpg real ), but then my round town drags my average over the tank down
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
bluecar1,

Thanks for the info. With all that said, I'll be delighted if the Ioniq gets even close to the mileage I'm getting with my current Prius. If it looks and drives as well as I expect it to, and also gets decent gas mileage, I'll definitely order one as soon as I can--in Phoenix Orange!

As you can see from my "garage," I tend to favor highly visible "assertive" colors in the cars I buy...
 

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I've read that the Ioniq doesn't use a conventional 12-volt battery but instead taps part of the high-voltage battery for accessory power, etc. But a video overview that I've seen clearly shows a 12-volt battery in a compartment at the right rear of the trunk in the hybrid version. I suspect the lack of a 12-volt may be just in the electric and/or plug-in versions. I don't see the battery access door in the picture of the electric that you mentioned.
Can you direct us to the video you're talking about? AFAIK, only EV model has a 12V battery under the hood.



curiosity what sort of MPG you guys getting from your prius? and is that mainly city or highway driving?
Short answer, 43-58MPG.
Long answer, First, about my car. 2010 Prius V with ATP package. It comes with 17" rims. Tires are 42-45 PSI. 50% top grill and 95% bottom grill blocked during standard time and removed during daylight savings time. Hood and fender gaps blocked year round. Second, about my driving conditions. Elevation around 300ft +-50ft around town. Most street limit is 45mph with some 50mph. highway limit is 70mph but I drive mostly at round 65mph. Third, about my driving style. I don't pulse and glide anymore. If I did, I get around 65mpg city. It's too demanding and it pisses off other drivers. I don't drive like a grandma either. I drive normal now. With all that said, here are my IRL MPG.
Lower MPG is highway, upper MPG is city.
Winter 35f-55f with heater 40-45MPG. Without heater 43-47 MPG.
Summer 90f-110f with AC 46-50MPG. Without AC 52-58MPG. Why only 52MPG even without AC? Heat kills MPG too. With high heat, regen is cut out due to high battery temp. Without regen, there's not enough EV power to initially get the car rolling. Engine fires up sooner. It wears out the brake pads too. With AC on, it cools the cabin and also cools down the battery so regen is regained. Sometimes it cuts the regen by 1/3 but at least it can still recover some energy.
Spring and fall 65f-85f 55-65MPG. Grills are still blocked, no AC or heater. Best MPG in this season.
This is for the tank, not just trips. My worst tank is about 500 miles for the tank. My best tank is just over 700 miles, mostly city. Most tanks are around 600 miles. Some are around 550-650 per tank.
The new EPA rule is even closer to real life MPG than the old rule. Unlike regular ICE, Hybrid MPG can vary a lot because you can adjust your driving style to increase EV assist or decrease EV assist. You don't have to drive like a grandma to get good MPG. In fact, the quicker you get to the speed limit, the longer you can sit at near 100mpg which would offset the extra gas needed to accelerate up to that speed. Sometimes, you can get better MPG in power mode than ECO mode. Hope this helps.
bluecar1,

Thanks for the info. With all that said, I'll be delighted if the Ioniq gets even close to the mileage I'm getting with my current Prius. If it looks and drives as well as I expect it to, and also gets decent gas mileage, I'll definitely order one as soon as I can--in Phoenix Orange!
This dude said Ioniq will get combined 58MPG vs Prius ECO's 56combined MPG.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
cproaudio,

I'm sorry, but I absolutely can't find the video in which I saw the battery in the trunk. I've been researching the Ioniq in a frenzy for the last week or so and I'm inundated with information. Unfortunately, I don't keep track of where I find stuff.

If memory serves, it was a long video--maybe 12 to 15 minutes. The first part was a detailed walkaround of the interior and exterior with a hand-held camera. The guy even opened the fuel cap and--this is key--opened the compartment in the trunk on the right side to reveal the battery, complete with black-plastic-covered positive terminal. That part specifically got my attention, because I had previously read that the Ioniq doesn't use a normal 12-volt battery, and the video contradicts that. The second part of the video is a lengthy drive shot with a camera mounted on the driver's head. Its extremely jerky, to the point that it made me queasy toward the end--and, as a licensed ex-pilot, it takes a lot to get me queasy.

If I ever re-find the video, I'll post a link--there may already be a link on one of the threads here.
 

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I read PriusChat every day, and many are reporting very high fuel efficiency..... better than the EPA numbers. Having owned a 2010 Prius, I believe Toyota made significant gains with the new Prius over the 3rd generation technically. I've heard the Ioniq is equally or better than the 3rd generation Prius, but falling short of the 4th generation. Personally, I'm not considering a Prius based solely on the appearance of the Prius. I find it disjointed, and unattractive. Many claim they don't care what it looks like ..... I am not one of those.

A good question that has been asked and I have not heard the answer to is if the Ioniq has a heat-pump? Any car consumes a lot of fuel warming the cabin on a cold morning. Except for appearance .... the Prius has many pluses. I really like the fact that the engine is beltless. I'm hesitant about the belt driven starter on the Ioniq. I'm undecided about the DCT vs the CVT. Rear seat headroom is a question. And, I wish the Ioniq offered more exterior colors.

I'm in the market .... but may sit this model year out on the sidelines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Stirfelt,

I understand the Ioniq will come in nine colors, even though the configurator on the Hyundai dealer website that bluecar1 posted about only allowed a choice of three when I last tried it. True, most of the colors are nondescript and boring, but there is a Phoenix Orange that catches my eye. The interior will apparently be either dark gray or tannish beige.

Living in the U.S. desert Southwest (and being retired), I have no need for "warming the cabin on a cold morning." If the weather is too cold, which is rare here, I'll just wait 'til the sun warms things up or stay home. However, I've read--probably in connection with researching the Chevy Volt--that heated seats make a huge difference in keeping the driver and passenger(s) warm and also save energy by reducing the need to heat the whole interior. I dunno, since I've never owned a car that had them.

I'm not sure exactly what you mean by "heat-pump." As I understand it, Priuses (Prii?) have a Thermos-like tank under the hood that holds some of the coolant and keeps it relatively warm for up to a couple of days, which speeds up the inefficient engine warmup time. I guess that also means the heater will blow hot air sooner than it would without such a system. I don't know if the Ioniq has a similar system.

Can you supply any more details on the Ioniq's belt-driven starter? That does sound like a poor design choice. Where did you get that information?

And I'm definitely with you--I'm also not one of those who doesn't care what the new Prius looks like!
 
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