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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Someone asked me recently how many kw it takes to charge my PHEV. I didn't know. But what I do know is that I've been unable to really even notice a rise in my electricity usage for my house. I use a regular 110 outlet near the garage, and plug it in overnight. In the Idaho, in the US, our electricity rates are low too. I have a 2022 Ionic PHEV. Anyone know how many kw?
Just to add more info, my electric rates in the summer (after 9 pm) are 12.66 cents per kWh, and in the winter 7.26 cents per kWh. So just pennies to drive around on my 27 miles of a fully charged battery (which I rarely exceed on a daily basis). Awesome.
 

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2020 Ioniq PHEV Limited
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Someone asked me recently how many kw it takes to charge my PHEV. I didn't know. But what I do know is that I've been unable to really even notice a rise in my electricity usage for my house. I use a regular 110 outlet near the garage, and plug it in overnight. In the Idaho, in the US, our electricity rates are low too. I have a 2022 Ionia PHEV. Anyone know how many kw?
8.9 kWh. Note the units are kilowatt-hours.
 

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2019 Ioniq PHEV (Preferred, i.e. base trim).
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I think that 8.9 kWh is the total battery capacity, but the car never lets it go below about 15% battery charge. If you’re in EV mode, it switches to Hybrid mode and turns on the gas engine between about 17% or 15%. If you’re in Hybrid mode, it keeps recharging the battery from the gasoline engine to keep it at or above 15%. It’s done for battery longevity, I think.

I’m not sure what happens if you run out of gasoline and try to drive on battery only. Would it let you go below 15%?

Anyway, with normal driving, you’d never need to use more than 8.9 kWh x 0.85 = about 7.6 kWh to fully recharge the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think that 8.9 kWh is the total battery capacity, but the car never lets it go below about 15% battery charge. If you’re in EV mode, it switches to Hybrid mode and turns on the gas engine between about 17% or 15%. If you’re in Hybrid mode, it keeps recharging the battery from the gasoline engine to keep it at or above 15%. It’s done for battery longevity, I think.

I’m not sure what happens if you run out of gasoline and try to drive on battery only. Would it let you go below 15%?

Anyway, with normal driving, you’d never need to use more than 8.9 kWh x 0.85 = about 7.6 kWh to fully recharge the battery.
These PHEVs are so smart!
Christiane
 

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2020 Ioniq PHEV Limited
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Yes, as @Ioniquest says, in practice I find I usually am adding about 7kWh after reaching home with 0 miles electric range. You're probably paying about 10 cents/kWh, so a charge costs 70 cents and will take you roughly the 29 miles range, which will vary based on how aggressively you drive, hills, etc.
 

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Does the car track kWh input or consumption? It's giving me all kinds of stats on MPG (about 250 MPG over my first 1,000 miles) but I am struggling to figure out how much electricity I'm using, and therefore I don't know my true cost per mile. It looks like the PHEV Watchdog app (paid edition) might give me the stats I want, but the documentation is pretty skimpy and I'm just not sure about it. (I do own an OBD adapter though.) Any suggestions?
 

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Does the car track kWh input or consumption? It's giving me all kinds of stats on MPG (about 250 MPG over my first 1,000 miles) but I am struggling to figure out how much electricity I'm using, and therefore I don't know my true cost per mile. It looks like the PHEV Watchdog app (paid edition) might give me the stats I want, but the documentation is pretty skimpy and I'm just not sure about it. (I do own an OBD adapter though.) Any suggestions?
From the Owners Manual for the Central Screen (Infotainment).

Font Communication Device Gadget Mobile device Technology



Font Audio equipment Technology Circle Parallel
 

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We average about 60 mpg running gas-only with flat battery. A full battery goes about 30 miles, so that's about the same as 1/2 gallon gas. Our electricity is expensive, sourced from the finest wind farms at $0.28 per kwh, so a charge costs $2, equivalent to $4 per gallon gas prices. Still we only use gas on road trips, around town we're electric only.
 

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Someone asked me recently how many kw it takes to charge my PHEV. I didn't know. But what I do know is that I've been unable to really even notice a rise in my electricity usage for my house. I use a regular 110 outlet near the garage, and plug it in overnight. In the Idaho, in the US, our electricity rates are low too. I have a 2022 Ionic PHEV. Anyone know how many kw?
My home charger has logged 1,308 charging sessions since I got my PHEV, and the most it has ever pulled in a single session was 8.584 kWh. More typically though it's around 7.5 kWh, and then of course "because physics", there's approximately a 10% loss in the charger between what was pulled from the wall and what actually went into the battery.

I keep a tracking spreadsheet for the car that estimates my home electricity cost by dividing each monthly bill by the monthly consumption (so that includes fixed costs plus the various time-of-use and delivery prices). Per that spreadsheet, my PHEV has consumed 6,541 kWh at a total cost of $864.98, for an average price of $0.132 per kWh, including paid public, free public, and at-home charging. My spreadsheet also tracks what I've spent on gas, how many kilometers I've driven, and what it would have cost me if I'd driven that distance in my old car at its 11.5 l/100km economy. In 34 months my Ioniq PHEV has saved me $11,035.07 CAD in energy versus keeping my 2012 Hyundai Genesis Coupe, and kept 17 tonnes of CO2 out of the atmosphere. I can't complain...
 

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2020 "Intense Blue" Ioniq Plugin Preferred
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I keep a tracking spreadsheet for the car that estimates my home electricity cost. . .
How are you keeping track of your charging sessions? I started a spreadsheet when I first got the car and was trying to track hydro as well as gas, but I eventually gave up. Absolutely no consistency in keeping track of charging times. Lots of short runs requiring half an hour to a couple of hours. Not that many that required a full charge. Be neat to find a meter I could plug into that would accumulate times.
 

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How are you keeping track of your charging sessions? I started a spreadsheet when I first got the car and was trying to track hydro as well as gas, but I eventually gave up. Absolutely no consistency in keeping track of charging times. Lots of short runs requiring half an hour to a couple of hours. Not that many that required a full charge. Be neat to find a meter I could plug into that would accumulate times.
I have the Flo Home X5, so I can just log onto their web site, enter a date range, and export a .csv file. I copy and paste from that into month-by-month tabs on my own spreadsheet, inserting rows for gas fill-ups and public charging by referring to the Fuelio and ChargePoint apps on my phone. A summary tab pulls totals from the month-by-month tabs.

I'm disappointed that Flo only tracks when I plugged in, when I unplugged, and the wH consumed in that period, rather than tracking the times that my car actually started and stopped charging. It makes it impossible (without concocting some seriously twisted Excel formulas) to factor in time of use pricing and the car's scheduled charging set up. Oh well, I've still got way more data logged than the average person. You'd think after three years I'd give up, but every few months I go back to it and spend a half hour data mining and backfilling...
 

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I have the Flo Home X5, so I can just log onto their web site, enter a date range, and export a .csv file. . . .
Thanks for that information. I do all my charging at 110v at the side of the house. Full charge in about 7 - 7 1/2 hours. Other than that I suck it up and use gas. Son'ts got a Level 2 and that takes about 2 hours but when I'm travelling I do point to point with one stop for gas. A two hour stop is not really cost/time effective. I'll either have to religiously record charging times (unlikely) or just forget the whole idea. Still terribly impressed with the gas mileage (kilometerage?) I get with this thing.
 

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Thanks for that information. I do all my charging at 110v at the side of the house.
In that case you could probably just get a Kill A Watt, it plugs into your outlet and then the car's cord plugs into it, and it will give you a running total on it's display. I have no idea if the thing's weatherproof though, you'll have to google for that info...

when I'm travelling I do point to point with one stop for gas. A two hour stop is not really cost/time effective.
Agreed. I only use public level 2 charging when convenient, like at the Burlington Ikea where it's free while I'm browsing and eating meatballs (and only if there's two or more other chargers still available for the pure EV drivers to use).
 

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2019 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-in
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When I used one of those for-pay chargers at Ikea, a charge from 21% to 100% was quantified as 7.56 KWh, or 95 Wh per 1% of charge..

However, I've also been using a Kill-A-Watt meter when I charge at home, and the real KWh used when going from 15% to 100% one time was ~8.56 KWh, or 100.7 Wh per 1% of charge. I've seen this vary between 8.25 to 9.25 KWh in the rough notes that I kept.
 

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Thanks to both KevinT & ecocentric, I was wondering if the Kill-A-Watt meter would handle that. I'll definitely give it a try. Going to have to come up with some weather-proofing though.
Just one quick question before I order. I charge at 12 amps (15amp breaker). Is this load going to blow up a Kill-A-Watt? I'm guessing not or ecocentric would have mentioned it.
 

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2020 Ioniq PHEV Limited, 2022 Tucson PHEV Limited, 2023 GV60 Performance
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When I used one of those for-pay chargers at Ikea, a charge from 21% to 100% was quantified as 7.56 KWh, or 95 Wh per 1% of charge..

However, I've also been using a Kill-A-Watt meter when I charge at home, and the real KWh used when going from 15% to 100% one time was ~8.56 KWh, or 100.7 Wh per 1% of charge. I've seen this vary between 8.25 to 9.25 KWh in the rough notes that I kept.
I had a Killawatt plugged in for a while to measure my Tucson PHEV using the stock Hyundai level 1 EVSE. Sometimes I use my level 2 Wallbox Pulsar when I need a quick top off for multiple trips in a day. The Killawatt consistently measured higher kWh used than the Wallbox. I believe part of the reason is that the Killawatt measures the kWh drawn from the wall which includes charging efficiency loss, whereas the Wallbox measures kWh delivered to the car.

If you're looking to purchase a power meter, the one big drawback of the Killawatt is that your running total is erased each time it is unplugged. I also have one of these below and it keeps all stats even after unplugging it for an extended period. Just search "power meter" on Amazon and you'll find it.

Measuring instrument Gadget Temperature Material property Service
 

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To answer the OP, I've been charging my Ioniq PHEV with my Wallbox Pulsar level 2 EVSE. For the past 2 days from 15% back to 100%, it reported 7.65kWh delivered to the car both times. I'd add 10-15% to that figure to account for efficiency loss.
 
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