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'17 Marina Blue HEV Ltd I O N I Q since 25 Jul '17
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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, I'm sure this has been talked about on here before, but I'm just gonna start a new thread anyway. Sorry.

Can anyone confirm on their Ioniq, if the Adaptive (Smart) Cruise Control actually engages the exterior brake lamps when it actually applies the brakes to slow for something?

It's only done it a couple of times at night when I might be able to glimpse the glow of the centre brake light in my rearview mirror, but has not looked like the lamps have actually engaged.

Last night, on an empty and dark road, I did my own experiment. With the cruise set to and the car traveling at 90 km/h, I reduced the set speed straight down to 40 km/h. I could see all but the bottom blue regen bar light up, but I could see no sign of any brake lamp engaging in my rearview mirror. As a test I also manually braked once and was able to clearly see the illumination of the centre brake lamp reflecting off the spoiler.

Does anyone know what the actual factory expected behaviour of this is?
 

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2017 Hyundai IONIQ Electric Premium
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Okay, I'm sure this has been talked about on here before, but I'm just gonna start a new thread anyway. Sorry.

Can anyone confirm on their Ioniq, if the Adaptive (Smart) Cruise Control actually engages the exterior brake lamps when it actually applies the brakes to slow for something?

It's only done it a couple of times at night when I might be able to glimpse the glow of the centre brake light in my rearview mirror, but has not looked like the lamps have actually engaged.

Last night, on an empty and dark road, I did my own experiment. With the cruise set to and the car traveling at 90 km/h, I reduced the set speed straight down to 40 km/h. I could see all but the bottom blue regen bar light up, but I could see no sign of any brake lamp engaging in my rearview mirror. As a test I also manually braked once and was able to clearly see the illumination of the centre brake lamp reflecting off the spoiler.

Does anyone know what the actual factory expected behaviour of this is?
It does.
 

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I'm not sure if ACC can actually brake "physically" (using wheel brakes).

From previous threads I have learned that when braking more than all regen bars, physical braking occurs. And that brake lights come on when the fourth bar of regen is lit. This is so seamless that I'm not aware of the difference.

As for ACC limiting the speed, either by going downhill or abruptly reducing set speed, and all four regen bar are lit, will brake lights be activated? I have often wondered myself, but never have seen it, as naturally very hard to see. So, your question is highly interesting!

I sometimes see other cars brake lights lit for a short time when actually braking manually seems unlikely, and thought that it might be an active cruise control slightly adjusting the speed. I have also hoped my Ioniq does not do that for very moderate regen braking.
 

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2017 Hyundai Ioniq Limited with Ultimate Package
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I'm not sure if ACC can actually brake "physically" (using wheel brakes).

From previous threads I have learned that when braking more than all regen bars, physical braking occurs. And that brake lights come on when the fourth bar of regen is lit. This is so seamless that I'm not aware of the difference.

As for ACC limiting the speed, either by going downhill or abruptly reducing set speed, and all four regen bar are lit, will brake lights be activated? I have often wondered myself, but never have seen it, as naturally very hard to see. So, your question is highly interesting!

I sometimes see other cars brake lights lit for a short time when actually braking manually seems unlikely, and thought that it might be an active cruise control slightly adjusting the speed. I have also hoped my Ioniq does not do that for very moderate regen braking.
The ACC is certainly capable of engaging the physical brakes. I've had it apply way more braking than the regen could handle. I can't imagine that it wouldn't light the brake lights if the slow down was severe enough.
I've done some experimenting. There is no definite formula for when the car lights the brake lights, especially with ACC. It seems to do it at 3-4 regen bars when manually braking but if the ACC is doing the braking, it won't necessarily. On my drive home I need to drive down a very steep hill. I decided to see if the ACC would maintain my speed down the hill and it did, using both regen and mechanical brakes. The brake lights never lit up at all, probably because the car wasn't actually slowing down, it just wasn't speeding up. I haven't noticed if they come on when the ACC does slow down the car for another car but it would seem like a giant and dangerous oversight if they didn't.
 

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On my HEV, CC won't work under 20 mph. On some of the steepest hills I could find, regen could hold the speed to 20 mph and the mechanical brakes did not engage. Regen is capable of some serious deceleration so you may be fooled into thinking those are mechanical brakes. Rather than using the brake pedal, I often just reduce the CC speed while coming to a stop - if I reduce it fast enough, it is more deceleration than I do on normal cars coming to a stop. I'd like to confirm myself if the brake lights go on during regen - I want to know what the car behind me thinks I'm doing.

I've only felt the mechanical brakes engage at speeds of less than 10 miles an hour, and even then, usually only for the final few feet of a full stop. At that speed, I can hear the scraping of the rotors on the disk removing rust.
 

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I know the mechanical brakes engage at low speeds for sure but I'm not sure how easy it is to tell that they're engaging at higher speeds. I can't imagine it's safe to apply too much braking force with just the front wheels. There's a risk of losing the back end on a slippery surface.
 

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Adaptive cruise control stops my Ioniq at lights - I have proven this about 6 times behind vehicles travelling at 60km/hr slowing to a stop. There is an instruction that then comes on saying you need to use RES or the accelerator to start the car moving again, it will not start up on it's own - I have also tested this.

When the car in front brakes heavily at a motorway speed I have also noticed the brakes coming on very hard, I always drive in regen 3 so know how hard that slows the car.

I love it, but hover my foot over the brake still, every time the car in front is actually stopping

No idea about the lights yet
 

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Be aware that in principle the HV, PHEV and EV variants of the Ioniq behave in a different manner concerning regen or physical braking, as the maximal level of regen differs a lot. Therefore, please explicitly show which variant you are talking about.
 

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Be aware that in principle the HV, PHEV and EV variants of the Ioniq behave in a different manner concerning regen or physical braking, as the maximal level of regen differs a lot. Therefore, please explicitly show which variant you are talking about.
Only the BEV has ACC with 'Stop and Go' function which @Nety describes, so that must be what he has! ;)
 

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The ACC is certainly capable of engaging the physical brakes. I've had it apply way more braking than the regen could handle. I can't imagine that it wouldn't light the brake lights if the slow down was severe enough.
Definately this. It's the one thing I don't like about the ACC, as it seems to break too heavily if someone pulls out of a lane in front of you (which is all too common an occurance on the M25).
 

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'17 Marina Blue HEV Ltd I O N I Q since 25 Jul '17
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Discussion Starter #12
Definately this. It's the one thing I don't like about the ACC, as it seems to break too heavily if someone pulls out of a lane in front of you (which is all too common an occurance on the M25).
What is your Smart Cruise Control Response set at? Fast? Normal? Slow?

I think Normal is factory default, but I changed mine to Slow and it's much better.
 

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Definately this. It's the one thing I don't like about the ACC, as it seems to break too heavily if someone pulls out of a lane in front of you (which is all too common an occurance on the M25).
I knew I was going to hate ACC before I bought my car and I do! It triggers a slowdown if someone is exiting on a surface street ahead of me with no danger of a collision. Some have complaints here about ACC causing increased fuel consumption on motorways. Amen! Why would anyone want to trust the fool ahead to drive smoothly? They don't. I use regular CC and maintain my distance, and make CC adjustments slowly up or down based on traffic far ahead of the next guy. On motorways I can usually time a pass to maintain speed. You cannot do that easily with ACC. ACC is for dense heavy surging and slowing traffic for those who want to arrive to work or home more relaxed. I don't play that game and prefer to maintain a more even speed than the "dumb" ACC can provide.
 

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I knew I was going to hate ACC before I bought my car and I do! It triggers a slowdown if someone is exiting on a surface street ahead of me with no danger of a collision. Some have complaints here about ACC causing increased fuel consumption on motorways. Amen! Why would anyone want to trust the fool ahead to drive smoothly? They don't. I use regular CC and maintain my distance, and make CC adjustments slowly up or down based on traffic far ahead of the next guy. On motorways I can usually time a pass to maintain speed. You cannot do that easily with ACC. ACC is for dense heavy surging and slowing traffic for those who want to arrive to work or home more relaxed. I don't play that game and prefer to maintain a more even speed than the "dumb" ACC can provide.
For the most part, I can't disagree with anything you said here but I still like using the ACC. Like anything, it takes some getting used to. If I know someone is going to exit in front of me, I try to change lanes if I can safely so my car doesn't slow down for someone exiting or I'll turn off the CC temporarily until they're not being read by the car anymore. Your way is better but I do like the more relaxed driving with ACC.
 

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I knew I was going to hate ACC ....
I also use ACC all the time. But that does not mean I am sleeping and do nothing. In those cases when cars exit, just press your accelerator lightly and your car will maintain speed. If in a turn or roundabout the car in front of you is out of sight for a while, you can even do the same if you are sensitive enough. Or indeed put ACC off and on again after. The Ioniq's safety systems are meant to be used in cooperation with you as driver, not as autonomous driving systems.
 

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Preamble: I have had cruise control on previous cars and have never really taken to it apart from on a stretch of very empty motorway in the North of England.

However having now had my Ioniq for six months I decided to revisit the feature. I have read the manual and flicked a few controls on the steering wheel. All this with the car stationary on the drive. Where I am now confused is that some replies on this thread seem to prefer CC to ACC or vice versa.

My question is whether the particular cruise control is model dependent or driver selected. I seem to default to ACC which I think I would prefer anyway but curious to discover whether I have a choice?
 

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Press and hold the distance adjustment button on the steering wheel for two to three seconds to switch between cruise control modes.
 

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'17 Marina Blue HEV Ltd I O N I Q since 25 Jul '17
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Discussion Starter #18
Preamble: I have had cruise control on previous cars and have never really taken to it apart from on a stretch of very empty motorway in the North of England.

However having now had my Ioniq for six months I decided to revisit the feature. I have read the manual and flicked a few controls on the steering wheel. All this with the car stationary on the drive. Where I am now confused is that some replies on this thread seem to prefer CC to ACC or vice versa.

My question is whether the particular cruise control is model dependent or driver selected. I seem to default to ACC which I think I would prefer anyway but curious to discover whether I have a choice?
If your Ioniq is equipped with ACC, then it is the default used when Cruise is switched on. Not all Ioniqs are equipped with ACC though. Some are only equipped with CC (usually lower trim levels).

Some notes though regarding ACC

  • Ioniqs equipped with ACC have a plastic stylized H badge on the front instead of chrome as this is the radar housing for the ACC
  • Regardless of being in ACC or CC mode, the speed is still set to a desired number of units (ie: 90 km/h or 55 mph) and using the +/Res and -/Set toggle button will change by 1 unit for single presses or 10km/h or 5 mph increments if you press and hold; CC mode basically just disables the radar.
  • Ioniqs not equipped with ACC, should have a traditional functioning CC, where the car will cease accelerating or decelerating as soon as you let go of the +/- toggle while holding it.
I really enjoy using the ACC (or as Hyundai dubs it, SCC; the S for Smart) myself, as it allows me to follow behind other vehicles, maintaining a safe distance, without having to worry about them altering their speed from time to time, and without me being edgy and wanting to get too close to them, which I have been prone to do if their going a little slower than I would like. It tempers me in this way. I also like being able to pre-set a preferred speed I'd like to actually go.


I believe in the UK, you also have a speed limiter feature. That's not something that's available for the Ioniq on my side of the pond. I'm not sure if it's tied to the ACC or not; but I imagine not as it's purpose, as I understand it, is to keep you from exceeding a certain speed when not using any form of CC.
 

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I believe in the UK, you also have a speed limiter feature. That's not something that's available for the Ioniq on my side of the pond. I'm not sure if it's tied to the ACC or not; but I imagine not as it's purpose, as I understand it, is to keep you from exceeding a certain speed when not using any form of CC.
Indeed. You select ACC or Limiter, can't have both at the same time... :)
 
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