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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Quite a number of reviews and first drives of the North American version have hit the press today:
NY Daily News (title says first drive, but quite in-depth)
TFL Car
Car & Driver (hybrid only)
Autoguide (Canadian Hybrid)
Autoguide (Canadian Electric)
Automobile Mag

I'm jealous; looks like the Canadian Electric still retains the copper interior accent trim.
 

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Thanks for that list of reviews. You beat me to my daily Google of them.

I read them all! Here's another Canadian one from today:
First Drive: 2017 Hyundai Ioniq | Driving

Good stuff and bad (all first drives from the recent Santa Barbara PR event), but almost all of them complained about road noise, as did a number of earlier European ones. That's a bit disheartening, and pushing me tentatively to the Niro, where most reviews comment on how refined (quiet) it is, at least on the base 16" wheels (the 18" models were noisier and harsher). I'd sure love to know how much of the Ioniq noise is related to the stock tires. Tires do vary dramatically in noise and low rolling resistance tires are often notably noisier.
 

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So, to whoever the jerk was that was giving me crap over my opinion of the terrible acceleration on the test drive of the Kia Niro which should be similar to the Ioniq: suck eggs. This is now the 3rd or 4th American review I've seen where the driver complains of the acceleration.

Even in sport mode, the hybrid's acceleration is laughable. The best part is that stomping on the gas from a dead stop creates all sorts of engine noise. But the speedometer is there to let you know it's a lot of racket for very little payoff.

Most of the time, this isn't a big deal. But I did have to adjust how I entered the freeway and overtaking other vehicles during uphill climbs was a struggle for the car. More often than not, I just waited until the road leveled off.

And in the video he says
"...its anemic and almost comically slow acceleration..."

It's not just bad, it's comically bad. Everyone seems to agree it is better in the EV though, so that's good for me if I do truly get the one I want.
 

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So, this leaves you with the only option: the fully EV version...
Very fast in acceleration, even in eco mode.
 

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So, to whoever the jerk was that was giving me crap over my opinion of the terrible acceleration on the test drive of the Kia Niro which should be similar to the Ioniq: suck eggs. This is now the 3rd or 4th American review I've seen where the driver complains of the acceleration.
I would assume that you refer to my comments. But could you please reconsider your tone if you want to be taken serious?

My opinion in the other thread was that if you end up in a situation where the only chance to avoid a collision is that you stomp the accelerator and rely on instant acceleration, then you did at least one mistake before. And I still stick to that. And none of the reviews proof me wrong. They complain about slow acceleration. Yes, that may or may not be. But that's was not my point. My point is that you should avoid such situations on public roads. Always! Even when you have the nicest sports car with ludicrous acceleration.

And I can only repeat myself, slow acceleration is in the eye of the beholder. I test drove it twice. Both times not too extensively. But compared to my current 2011 compact car with a 1.6l turbocharged Diesel with 115 hp and 6 speed manual transmission it did not feel any slower. I don't expect a sports car and I don't need a sports car. I drive my cars with an eye on fuel efficiency. I would never go to the extremes as some of the hypermilers but I don't see any point in brisk acceleration either. In the past five years and 220000 km I had less than ten times the urge to downshift several gears for any overtaking on a cross country road. So I can perfectly live without it and any anemic behaviour is soooo irrelevant to me. With my current car I could easily do German autobahns at 160km/h without any brisk maneuvers at all and always in final gear. Just slow to medium acceleration. It's all about about adapting my expectations and my driving style to my car.

Why am I telling all of this? My aim is not to deny any of this behaviour of the Ioniq. I also don't want to defend it. Probably I have to considerably adapt to a DCT automatic gear box and I will curse it more than once. I am just annoyed when you mix up personal opinions with absolute statements. And don't call me again a fan boy. I am not. I simply point out flaws in your reasoning.

I am looking for a slightly bigger car with good to excellent fuel economy for long highway commutes and I would like to avoid a diesel. So that's why I ended up looking into the Prius and the Ioniq. And horsepower and zero to 100km/h are values completely irrelevant to me. It needs to have enough hp to go 130km/h on the highway. And I could do that with my previous car with less than 90 hp with ease. So anything above 100hp will suit my needs. That's MY needs! So for me the Ioniq will fit. If it does not for you that's your view. So again, please don't mix up personal preferences with absolute statements. You can make your choice and I will make my choice. But don't insult anyone over their choice!

And by the way, you noted this review?
2017 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid First Drive | Review | Car and Driver
The Ioniq’s hybrid powertrain suffers a few drivability quirks. Under very light throttle—when parking, for instance—there’s an uncomfortably long pause before power arrives, and on an incline the Ioniq will sometimes roll backward in the meantime. But we couldn’t replicate the low-speed bucking and rolling-stop uncertainties we noticed in the closely related Niro—perhaps an indication that Hyundai has further refined this system.
So there's seems to be some kind of improvement over the Niro.

And some food for thought for you. You have been rather happy with your Prius. But I could find hundreds of reviews complaining about its acceleration. So what's the point? Apparently these reviewers had a different mind set than you. Does it make your Prius a bad car? No, of course not. I know that reviews are currently the only source of information for you over there. But don't put too much weight into them. Wait patiently and drive it yourself. Then make up your mind.
 

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There is zero doubt that acceleration is relatively poor in these cars. That is not an opinion, that is factual. As best I can tell, you think people should adjust to their cars, rather than use their preferences to choose a car. That is not only your opinion, but doesn't reflect real human behavior. Certainly one adjusts to their purchases, but only after picking what they believe to be their best choice. One way we do that is by discussion, like we are here. Opinions shed new light on facts. Name calling is wrong, but was the result of rather insulting posts by you.

Personally, I love to overtake, and I do that readily in cars I have owned that had only one third the HP of the Ioniq (VW bug) with good planning. But I do have give up overtaking on uphills, and would expect that to be the case in the Ioniq/Niro.
 

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There is zero doubt that acceleration is relatively poor in these cars. That is not an opinion, that is factual. As best I can tell, you think people should adjust to their cars, rather than use their preferences to choose a car. That is not only your opinion, but doesn't reflect real human behavior. Certainly one adjusts to their purchases, but only after picking what they believe to be their best choice. One way we do that is by discussion, like we are here. Opinions shed new light on facts. Name calling is wrong, but was the result of rather insulting posts by you.

Personally, I love to overtake, and I do that readily in cars I have owned that had only one third the HP of the Ioniq (VW bug) with good planning. But I do have give up overtaking on uphills, and would expect that to be the case in the Ioniq/Niro.
Well it's never black or white.

I know that acceleration is not stellar. But if we are talking about facts, then we should discuss numbers like 0-100kph or 60-100kph, the latter probably being more relevant for overtaking. We could also measure the delay between stomping the pedal and the start of the acceleration. These would be facts. And according to such numbers, the Ioniq doesn't fare too bad. If you like the behaviour (delay between pedal and acceleration) and if the acceleration is sufficient for you, that's an opinion.

And I think we are both pretty much aligned that picking a car is a complex process. And I never said anyone should pick a car he doesn't like at all. But picking a car and driving with it is sure a matter of compromises. And fuel efficiency and sports car like behaviour are two things that just don't add up. One certainly has to make a compromise between these features. And the more fuel efficient a car is the more - well - sluggish it usually behaves. That's clear from the beginning (at least to me). So my expectation is that I may have choices from dreadful sluggish to moderately sluggish. But I am willing to accept it because my personal preference is pretty much on the fuel efficiency side.

Back to the reviews and the conclusion you drew that you have to give up overtaking on uphills. Do you really believe this in its literal meaning? Not possible? Not at all? Come on. The Ioniq will certainly be more capable of doing so than your VW bug.

You have to take all the reviews with a grain of salt and keep an eye on the track record of the reviewer. What are his personal preferences of cars. Then you can better judge any of those seemingly factual remarks. Most often they are not factual but heavily biased. In German language reviews one also has to consider that most of them are biased towards German manufacturers because they are the basis for most of the revenue in ads. Moreover most of them are heavily biased towards sports cars. And lots of them just repeat the wordings of the press releases. In summary it's a poor situation. I don't know the situation in the US but I would expect similar factors in play.

Thus nobody should take any of the reviews as factual descriptions. They might help but all of them are biased. To collect meaningful information out of these try to read reviews of the same reviewer of (a) comparable cars and of (b) cars you know very well. In particular I myself am waiting desperately for any comparative reviews. This is partly the reason that I delayed the purchase. Don't think that I am without any doubts about the Ioniq and exactly the DCT is the point which I am most skeptical of. But we should never ever trust blindly in such evidently exaggerated statements like overtaking uphill would not be possible. Which - to be fair - the reviewer never said. He writes: "But I did have to adjust how I entered the freeway and overtaking other vehicles during uphill climbs was a struggle for the car." (https://www.engadget.com/2017/02/20/hyundai-ioniq-ev-hybrid-review/) Which is really not a big surprise for a car with a combustion engine of 105 hp.

Just take a test drive and judge for yourself! But don't be surprised or disappointed by the obvious!
 

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Can't see any problem with the acceleration personally . I've found it has sufficient overtaking acceleration on the motorways at around about 70 mph , at the end of the day it's all you can legally do in the UK . Even on A roads , when I've had people tailgating me , I've either thought " to **** with it ,I can't be bothered " and called them on to pass me . Other times , I've dropped it into Sport and watched them fade into the distance in my rear view mirror .
I'm getting to that stately age now where I can't see the point in rushing everywhere building up points on my driving licence again . It's clean now and that's the way I want it to stay :) . I bought the car for it's practicality and economy and it get's full marks for that from me .Despite it's sporty look it's not presented by Hyundai as a performance car , that would be the i30N
 

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Yet early reports suggested the boot was 100 litres smaller than the HEV ? All rather confusing :)
 

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An interesting detail about the Ioniq plug in version appeared in a review today: the larger 8.9 KW hour battery still fits completely under the rear seats! Good news to my ears if true. Earlier comments seemed to imply raising the load floor to accommodate the extra batteries as is done on the EV.
I found an additional review comment that said some of the additional battery needed for the plug in will be under the load floor where the spare can fit (but is not supplied in most markets). Again implying no load floor rise. I'm certainly OK with the loss of the cubby there, I can't quite image what I would have stashed there.
 

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Yet early reports suggested the boot was 100 litres smaller than the HEV ? All rather confusing :)
I haven't seen that figure, but certainly a couple hundred pound battery has to go somewhere!
 

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I would assume that you refer to my comments. But could you please reconsider your tone if you want to be taken serious?
:Waves white flag/extends olive branch: I appreciate the additional comments/explanation. We'll just agree to disagree at least on certain aspects, but I get what you're saying.

My opinion in the other thread was that if you end up in a situation where the only chance to avoid a collision is that you stomp the accelerator and rely on instant acceleration, then you did at least one mistake before. And I still stick to that.
I will still stick to the fact that in some situations acceleration is a necessity. Take Southern California for instance where some highway connections are like a bowl of spaghetti. There are times when you are on one highway where you take an exit that dumps you on to another highway, and then you literally have 1/4 mile to cross from the right side over 7 lanes of busy traffic with idiots going 90 mph so you can get to the new on-ramp for another connecting highway on the left side. It's actually a bit scary even for experienced drivers in heavy traffic. If you miss the exit ramp, you now have to go 20 minutes out of your way to get back to where you need to go. It's not safe, or legal, to sit on your butt with your turn signal on blocking traffic trying to slowly move over bit by bit to cross all the lanes. It's not practical. Instead, you need to quickly accelerate up to (and beyond a little) the speed of traffic already on the highway, which is what the ramp is for, despite how some people use it. To make matters worse, some of the on-ramps are practically nothing in terms of how much distance you have before you run out of road.

And I can only repeat myself, slow acceleration is in the eye of the beholder...It's all about adapting my expectations and my driving style to my car.
I'd have to agree with yticolev below regarding the acceleration and human behavior.

You have been rather happy with your Prius. But I could find hundreds of reviews complaining about its acceleration. So what's the point? Apparently these reviewers had a different mind set than you.
I agree that many reviewers complained about the acceleration of the Prius. That may just be because it was the new kid in town and folks were new to how a hybrid drives. Ioniq might just be the new one to pick on. Off the line from a dead stop, my Prius c (I can't say for the other models) takes off like a rocket. It helps that the car is incredibly light. Now, what reviewers may interpret as slow acceleration may just be once the car gets up to 50-55mph, the engine and motor struggle when you want to speed up quickly. So, trying to overtake someone on the highway when you're already going 75mph is going to take a while with your foot all the way down. So we may be muddying the difference between acceleration and responsiveness. As I said before, the acceleration on the Ioniq was actually good once it decided to do something. There is just a very long awkward pause of nothing after stepping on the pedal and that weirds me out. I saw another new review today saying the same thing, that they were concerned about the length of time the car takes to respond. It also makes me uncomfortable that the car has the potential to either take off or not depending on what gear it's in, etc. I understand with the transmission they used it needs to change gears, but it needs to do it faster. At least my Prius is predictably fast at low speeds and has a predictable although slow climb in mph at highway speeds, but it's always responsive and immediately reacts to what I am doing. That's what "feels" right--the car doing what I tell it to when I tell it to do it.
 

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we have some fairly rough traffic over here in the UK, but normally when it gets rough it slows to below 50, and motorway junctions are generally pretty well designed but there are a few left over from the 60's and 70'swhich leave a bit t be desired


but so far I have left a few boy racers behind at lights wondering what's under the bonnet, trick is not to just floor it as you can spin up the fronts and go nowhere when the traction control kicks in and drops the power on you, trick is to smoothly push the peddle to the floor over a second or two and is surprising how quick the Ioniq will take off, basically give it an idea of what you want rather than surprise it


from a standing start it is very quick, if you suddenly want to go from an easy going 50 to 70+ rapidly try and give it a bit of time to change down, so use the tools like as you come up the ramp / slip road stick it in sport if you know you will need an extra bit of power and the gearbox won't change up so easily so will only need to change down 1 gear not two so will be more responsive


thing is to learn how to drive it
 

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An interesting detail about the Ioniq plug in version appeared in a review today: the larger 8.9 KW hour battery still fits completely under the rear seats! Good news to my ears if true. Earlier comments seemed to imply raising the load floor to accommodate the extra batteries as is done on the EV.
https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/244708-2017-hyundai-ioniq-platform-hybrid-ev-plug-no-gas-engines
Yep I read that too. That is a HUGE improvement over the Prius Prime. If you look at the trunk in the Prime, it looks really strange...it is almost as if the Prime battery packaging was an afterthought to Toyota. I really thought Toyota could have packaged it better!

Here is a pic of the Prius Prime trunk : https://goo.gl/images/bHpwIp
 

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That does look bad. Even worse with the seats down. I found a picture:
http://blog.consumerguide.com/wp-co...6/10/Screen-Shot-2016-10-03-at-5.31.56-PM.png

Those pictures imply that the whole story is not yet known on how the Ioniq/Niro PHEVs are going to implement the larger battery.

I found another pair of new reviews that has not been posted to this thread yet:
http://www.autoblog.com/2017/02/20/2017-hyundai-ioniq-hybrid-phev-first-drive-review/
Head of the class | 2017 Hyundai Ioniq Electric First Drive - Autoblog
 
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