Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner

21 - 40 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
We just tested this yesterday...regardless of setting (1/2/3) the brake lights did not come on...and at lower speeds (e.g. neighbourhood 40km/h) level 3 will just about stop the car in short order. But I do notice that it depends on the level and speed you're going at. Eg. going along at 60km/h and lifting off with Level 1/2 doesn't seem to be drastic...but level 2/3 at 30km/h feels like you're hitting the brakes firmly. So same here...we're very conscious of what the person behind us might be seeing as we slow down without the tail lights on.
Interesting - thanks for reporting on this. I'm guessing that the braking force you get depends on the level of regeneration you set, and the gear the car is in at the time. It's definitely a worry to me that I can be braking quite stongly, but the driver behind sees no warning light. I haven't been rear-ended yet, though, and I guess somebody must have investigated the safety angle before allowing the cars to be sold. Maybe??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
We're going to test this again...but with me following my wife in our other car. Just around the local block (40KM/H zone)...regen on and driving "normally" around and regen'ing at bends when we'd normally let off and at the stop signs. I'm wondering if our last test was correct. I was standing on the sidewalk as my wife drove around the block and engaged the regen (had it set and just let off) in front of our house. I'm wondering if it didn't really engage fully (noticed it slow down by eye watching it from my view)...maybe we were at too full of a charge for it to really do it's thing. Anyways, I'll post what happens...we'd both like to know for sure. If the brake lights don't engage on their own when it feels like they should...then we'll adjust our usage accordingly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
I verified my brake lights do come on during level 3 Regen when slowing down, without touching the brake pedal.

I did not try levels 2 or 1 yet, as I always use 3. This was at speeds from 40mph, down to almost a stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
We're going to test this again...but with me following my wife in our other car. Just around the local block (40KM/H zone)...regen on and driving "normally" around and regen'ing at bends when we'd normally let off and at the stop signs. I'm wondering if our last test was correct. I was standing on the sidewalk as my wife drove around the block and engaged the regen (had it set and just let off) in front of our house. I'm wondering if it didn't really engage fully (noticed it slow down by eye watching it from my view)...maybe we were at too full of a charge for it to really do it's thing. Anyways, I'll post what happens...we'd both like to know for sure. If the brake lights don't engage on their own when it feels like they should...then we'll adjust our usage accordingly.
We retested just now tonight. 40km/h, runs around our residential block. Confirmed that at Level 1 and Level 2 the brake lights do not come on. At level 3 the brake lights come on.

Level 1...by eye/observation it doesn't really seem to be "braking", more just driver let off and the car is slowing normally (maybe just a bit more than coasting to a stop). By driver feel...can feel it engage regen, but it's not drastic.
Level 2...by eye, definitely seems like the car is actively slowing down vs just let off and coast. By feel, definitely feels like you're apply light brakes. I'd feel better if the brake lights came on. In one run there was another car behind and it closed the gap in short order.

Level 3...definitely the car slows quickly and feels like you're applying brakes, and brake lights come on right away. That's reassuring.

If the batt is fully charged and you turn on regen and let off, you get a display warning that regen can't be engaged.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
Good work, TysX10! This is really good to know. Would be good if Hyundai documented this somewhere obvious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
because the heating and ventilation need the engine to run a lot of the time, even when the car is being pushed along electrically. I'm not giving black marks here, though. The hybrid design obviously involves compromises, and I can't expect it to be tailored exactly to my circumstances. Fuel economy still looks pretty good, but time will tell.
Same here~
If it can reassure: the "engine energy" is not not totally lost: the heat is send to the cabin, of course, but during the time the engine turns burning fuel, it’s actually recharging the battery aswell. It’s quite well designed.
Also, the "flaps" on the front of the car avoid cold air going to the engine. On a regular car (or on a long trip in a PHEV), this is needed to cool the engine, but here, the flaps are closed so it heats very fast.

I don’t have the "heated seats + heated driving wheel" option (wasn’t available here in France as a standalone option, only with a full and quite expensive package), but the people that have it use that instead of the air vents.
They say it’s enough to warm them up without using petrol. It will obviously use some extra electricity, but nothing compared to the energy required to move the car : you would need to use an 2000W electric heating for 4 hours straight to drain it.

On an EV, this would be a problem. But on a PHEV that is designed to run only mild-short distances, it’s not a problem: you won’t be in the car for long. and if you do, well, you’ll need the thermal engine whatsoever, thus producing heat. If I had to drive long distances to work (I’m driving 9 miles / 13 km), I’d start on HEV mode to heat the car and then go on EV, once the car is heated and that heating is sufficient for you to end your trip.


I worry a little about whether the brake lights come on when I do this though.
I mainly use the stearing-whell paddles to adjust the regenetive braking. What I’ve noticed is that, on the 2020 model at least, is that the level 3 turns the brake lights on. The level 1 does not. For the level 2, it depends : when going from 1 to 2, it does not. When going from 3 to 2, the light go on at 3 and remain lit on 2, until you push the gas pedal or put the regen on 1 or 0. It’s quite clever.
 

·
Registered
Iconiq plug in. 2019
Joined
·
44 Posts
I will be fitting the DEFA block heater before the start of next winter, so when the temps dip below freezing I can prewarm the ICE to a usable temperature before the start of my journey,
Two benefits being a warm interior more or less straight away and a engine not running on its cold start settings, so less fuel plus less pollution and better for the engine overall,
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq Premium SE PHEV
Joined
·
38 Posts
No. The app doesn't give me that option. And I don't think it would work, because the heating doesn't function without the engine running. Maybe with the pure electric version . . . ? The heated seat gets you warm fairly quickly, though.
In the UK the BlueLink app is unable to schedule temperature settings remotely to the Ioniq PHEV. This can only be done to the Full Electric EV vehicle. (See page 28 of glossy showroom brochure!)
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq Premium SE PHEV
Joined
·
38 Posts
It's just over a month since I traded my Ford Focus Estate for a 2020 Ioniq Plug-In Premium SE. Here are some first impressions that might interest anyone thinking of a similar move. Overall, there is a lot to like, but there have been some disappointments too; let's get those out of the way first.

1) The Hyundai website told me that a Shale Leather interior was an option at no extra cost, and I liked the look of it. But no cars with this interior are actually being sold - it's Dark Grey or nothing. Never mind. Dark Grey turns out not to be as gloomy as it sounds, and my cabin is a perfectly pleasant place to be.
2) The Hyundai website also makes a big selling point of "The stylish and intricate alloy wheels [which] are aerodynamically sculpted to minimize air turbulence and deliver optimal fuel economy." They do look great; only problem is that Hyundai don't put them on the cars they actually deliver. The ones you get look fairly downmarket by comparison. Sorry, Hyundai, but you get a BLACK MARK for that.
3) I drive about 10 miles most days, with occasional longer trips. So with a 39 mile electric range, I thought I could do most of my driving without burning fuel. No. Not in winter, at least, because the heating and ventilation need the engine to run a lot of the time, even when the car is being pushed along electrically. I'm not giving black marks here, though. The hybrid design obviously involves compromises, and I can't expect it to be tailored exactly to my circumstances. Fuel economy still looks pretty good, but time will tell.

OK, so what's good? Just about everything else! Colourwise, I took a risk on the new Electric Shadow, though it's hard to tell from photos on the web just what it looks like in reality. I hoped for something distinctive but understated, and am well pleased with what I got. In a dull light, it's more or less grey, but there is a hint of greenish blue that I find very pleasing, especially in a decent light. And the new front end styling is a great improvement to my eye (not that I want to undermine anyone's affection for the older version).

Electric driving, which I hadn't experienced before, is quiet and smooth, though inevitably some road and wind noise is apparent at higher speeds. Even when the engine kicks in, it is reasonably unobtrusive, and the transition is smooth. I had worried that with the weight of engine, motor and batteries the Plug-in might be underpowered, but I have found no problem at all (though admittedly I am not a particularly sporty driver). And I do love the regenerative braking. Advise me to get a life if you like, but it is hugely satisfying to know that I am recovering energy rather than wearing out brake pads! I worry a little about whether the brake lights come on when I do this though. Can anyone help me out here?

I have a smartphone, a tablet and a laptop, and I was sceptical about whether I needed another pc-like screen sticking up from my dashboard, notwithstanding that several manufacturers are moving that way. I have been pretty much won over, though. The navigation map is bright and sharp, the view from the rear camera is not quite high-definition, but perfectly usable, and although the touchscreen response is sometimes a little slow, this is not a significant problem. Controls for the climate system audio and so on are almost all touch-sensitive virtual buttons rather than mechanical ones. I have seen reviews that complain about this, but everything works fine, and to me it makes for an appealing, clean design. There are a host of driving aids, which will be more useful to some folks than to others. To me, the lane-following system is of doubtful value, for example, but I love the fact that the wing mirrors automatically dip when I go into reverse, so I can actually see the parking space I'm aiming for!

By and large, then, I am loving this car! SHAME ABOUT THE WHEELS, THOUGH.
The alloy wheels on the Ioniq 2020 differ between the Phev and the full Electric EV.
I'm very happy with the trims on the 2020 Phev.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
I'm considering a Ioniq Plug-in, as it has the reassuring extra miles through the ICE.
Driving from home with no sound is a dream of mine.

So, has anyone used the mobile app to preheat the car before taking off?
Used it (blu link) last winter in my phev. Works OK. These get the heat from an exhaust heat recovery system so you dont need to heat all the coolent. You set the cabin temp in the app.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Like the other posters I use the electric heating of seats and steering wheel especially if I am on my own. If I was going on a longer journey and it was cold I might switch to hybrid mode immediately to get the engine and cabin up to temperature quickly but that is rarely necessary. You should find that the electric range improves as it gets warmer and the car has covered more miles. (Don't ignore sport mode completely it can be useful for joining fast roads or giving it a bit of oomph on a hill. Try it out on a quiet bit of road first if you like as it is a bit lively).
David, don’t ignor sport mode at all. Have you forgotten that the vehicle will fully recharge while driving in sport mode? At 110 kmph in 6th gear it will recharge in about 99 miles and give you 42.6 mpg. In 5th gear at the same speed it will recharge in just over 50 min and gives 34.2 mpg. You give up 8 mpg but only for 47 minutes less time. I only drive in 2 modes. Electric or sport. I am either driving electric or charging while driving so I can get back to all electric! Using 5th gear to recharge, the ratio is roughly 2 to 1. For every 2 miles on gas, you acquire about 1 mile of electric driving. In Ontario, Canada right now, we are paying about .90 cents a litre. When your charge is depleted and hybrid kicks in, you will get about 51 to 52 mpg at 65 mph but using sport mode for 50 minutes to recharge will give only 34.2 mpg. This loss of 15 mpg for 50 minutes uses only an insignificant amount of extra gas but of course you now will drive the next 30 miles using zero gas and your average mpg regains as much or more than you gave up while charging and you don’t stop to plug in anywhere but at home.
I am on my second Ioniq PHEV and I have driven from Ontario Canada to SAN Francisco, California twice and to Houston , Texas twice, logged over 50,000 total miles (nearly 1/2 in all electric) and I have 10 or 12 pages of notes from experiments in every gear, every speed, in every type of terrain and every type of weather.
For what it is worth, in a recent experiment in rural, lower speed driving (50 mph max and using always level 3 regen braking when slowing or stopping in small towns) I drove just over 46 miles on 1 charge and this was 4 miles better than my 2018 did on the identical route. I had also found a way to make my 2018 fully recharge in hybrid mode while yielding about 47 mpg while charging.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
I believe that all the Canadian HEV/PHEVs have the Cold Climate Package, it wasn't a separately priced option in 2019. It does not include the heat pump which was only on the two EV trims, I suspect it refers to the exhaust heat recovery system and heated front seats. Heated rear seats and steering wheel came on every 2019 Canadian IONIQ except the Essential (i.e. most basic) HEV trim.
Kevin, all Canadian Ioniq PHEVs come equipped with a PTC (positive thermal co-efficient) heater. It electrically heats the coolant and you should start getting warm air in just 2 or 3 blocks in colder weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
David, don’t ignore sport mode at all. Have you forgotten that the vehicle will fully recharge while driving in sport mode?
The price of gas as you call it is double your 90 cents CDN in the UK. There was one UK guy on the forum who tended to agree with you, but the general concensus in the UK at least is that it is not very efficient. I did try it on a long drive and did not find it altogether successful so I simply use sport when I need to and not specifically to charge the battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
The price of gas as you call it is double your 90 cents CDN in the UK. There was one UK guy on the forum who tended to agree with you, but the general concensus in the UK at least is that it is not very efficient. I did try it on a long drive and did not find it altogether successful so I simply use sport when I need to and not specifically to charge the battery.
I can certainly understand what you are saying and things will vary everywhere in this world. If you take a quick look on a Canadian map, I live in Sarnia Ontario Canada which is about 1200 metres from the U S border. So 90% of my travel trips are to the U S somewhere and current gas prices in the U S average about 59 cents a litre, (about $2.25) for a U S gallon. When we put that into the mix of a trip to California or Florida, it becomes ludicrous to even talk about gas costs for a plug in hybrid. On a drive to visit relatives in Houston, Texas in February (wouldn’t go near there right now!!), it cost me about $96 for gas for a round trip of 2900 miles. I did plug in each night while at my sisters home, so all driving while in Houston was free.
But let me ask a question. Are you saying that petrol as you call it, costs about $1.80 Canadian or nearly $7 for one US gallon? My Dodge Ram truck that I pull my camper with, holds 33 U S gallons so it would cost well over $200 to fill up. If this is correct, how in **** do you folks travel anywhere? I mean, when I pull my 30 foot Jayco 1 bedroom apartment to our lot in Florida each year, it runs about $225 one way. Beer is about $14 or $15 for a 30 pack, decent Canadian whiskey is about $15 for a half gallon bottle and we have about 800 miles of free paved bicycle routes to ride our e bikes on from town to town. I gather you are suggesting that I cannot do that in the U K? You guys need to talk to Bo Jo or somebody I would say. And as soon as our American friends get rid of the lunatic they have in the White..... oh ****, don’t let me even go there!
🇨🇦🇺🇸🍺🥃
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
550 Posts
'Lockdown' was forcing price low but is creeping up again per litre:
UKP 1.259 CAD 2.13
UKP 1.119 CAD 2.01 You do the sums :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Sad. Covid has changed life for all of us I guess. Looks like 2020 is going to be a write off year which is bad enough for 30 to 50 year olds but when you are nearly 76, a blank year is a pretty big penalty in your life.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ioniq Plugin, Phantom black
Joined
·
101 Posts
As an example there is a journey I make fairly often of around 30 miles with myself and my wife. We rarely have the A/C on and the journey is usually all electric with sometimes say 6 miles reduction of petrol range and a fairly similar overall reduction in overall range, ie total mileage 30 miles total range reduction 36 miles. Outside temperature about 8-10 degrees C.

Today I repeated the journey in similar temperature but we took an old lady out for her birthday so there was one extra passenger. The journey was 9 miles longer at 39 miles, the A/C was on at 20.5 the whole time and there was no manual control of the HEV setting. All of the electricity was used and the petrol range had decreased by 17 miles more than the journey would suggest. Therefore at a very rough guess the extra passenger and full use of the A/C had cost about 12 miles of petrol.
David, in Canada we call old people seniors!
;)😁
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
David, don’t ignor sport mode at all. Have you forgotten that the vehicle will fully recharge while driving in sport mode? At 110 kmph in 6th gear it will recharge in about 99 miles and give you 42.6 mpg. In 5th gear at the same speed it will recharge in just over 50 min and gives 34.2 mpg. You give up 8 mpg but only for 47 minutes less time. I only drive in 2 modes. Electric or sport. I am either driving electric or charging while driving so I can get back to all electric! Using 5th gear to recharge, the ratio is roughly 2 to 1. For every 2 miles on gas, you acquire about 1 mile of electric driving. In Ontario, Canada right now, we are paying about .90 cents a litre. When your charge is depleted and hybrid kicks in, you will get about 51 to 52 mpg at 65 mph but using sport mode for 50 minutes to recharge will give only 34.2 mpg. This loss of 15 mpg for 50 minutes uses only an insignificant amount of extra gas but of course you now will drive the next 30 miles using zero gas and your average mpg regains as much or more than you gave up while charging and you don’t stop to plug in anywhere but at home.
I am on my second Ioniq PHEV and I have driven from Ontario Canada to SAN Francisco, California twice and to Houston , Texas twice, logged over 50,000 total miles (nearly 1/2 in all electric) and I have 10 or 12 pages of notes from experiments in every gear, every speed, in every type of terrain and every type of weather.
For what it is worth, in a recent experiment in rural, lower speed driving (50 mph max and using always level 3 regen braking when slowing or stopping in small towns) I drove just over 46 miles on 1 charge and this was 4 miles better than my 2018 did on the identical route. I had also found a way to make my 2018 fully recharge in hybrid mode while yielding about 47 mpg while charging.
I'd like to run some math on you scenario here:

Assuming all these numbers you reported are true, its pretty easy to calculate the equivalence:

Your 6th gear scenario: 99 miles at 42.6 MPG = 2.32 gallons of fuel. 99 miles + 29 miles EV = 128 miles / 2.32g = 55 mpg equivalent
Your 5th gear scenario: 65mph*50mins/60mins = 54.2 miles at 34.2 mpg = 1.58 gallons of fuel. 54.1 + 29 miles EV = 52.6 mpg equivalent.

It seems like it would be a wash to running in hybrid mode even in this case, as I'd imagine probably the hybrid efficiency will probably report 55-60mpg under similar scenarios (i do think from the nature of this post there would be a tendency to underestimate the pure hybrid mode and overestimate the charging efficiency). That said, I am a bit surprised it even worked out this well, as I would have expected it to be worse due to the discussion of the thermodynamics that was in the other post (it can only do worse, as a matter of basic physics, mostly likely worse by the electrical charging losses, which I'd wager to be around 10%) . If these numbers are true though this would mean there might be some cases where you want to run in sport mode to gain maybe 10 miles or so of electric range so that you can operate efficiently if you expect stop and go traffic. I'll have to give this a try in my 2019 PHEV to see if I can reproduce.

This makes me wonder though, would a PHEV system that can recharge a battery through the waste heat of the ICE be feasible? This would actually make it possible to win range. I'm sure someone has considered this at some point and the fact that it doesn't exist probably means it doesn't make sense from either a cost or technical standpoint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
I'd like to run some math on you scenario here:

Assuming all these numbers you reported are true, its pretty easy to calculate the equivalence:

Your 6th gear scenario: 99 miles at 42.6 MPG = 2.32 gallons of fuel. 99 miles + 29 miles EV = 128 miles / 2.32g = 55 mpg equivalent
Your 5th gear scenario: 65mph*50mins/60mins = 54.2 miles at 34.2 mpg = 1.58 gallons of fuel. 54.1 + 29 miles EV = 52.6 mpg equivalent.

It seems like it would be a wash to running in hybrid mode even in this case, as I'd imagine probably the hybrid efficiency will probably report 55-60mpg under similar scenarios (i do think from the nature of this post there would be a tendency to underestimate the pure hybrid mode and overestimate the charging efficiency). That said, I am a bit surprised it even worked out this well, as I would have expected it to be worse due to the discussion of the thermodynamics that was in the other post (it can only do worse, as a matter of basic physics, mostly likely worse by the electrical charging losses, which I'd wager to be around 10%) . If these numbers are true though this would mean there might be some cases where you want to run in sport mode to gain maybe 10 miles or so of electric range so that you can operate efficiently if you expect stop and go traffic. I'll have to give this a try in my 2019 PHEV to see if I can reproduce.

This makes me wonder though, would a PHEV system that can recharge a battery through the waste heat of the ICE be feasible? This would actually make it possible to win range. I'm sure someone has considered this at some point and the fact that it doesn't exist probably means it doesn't make sense from either a cost or technical standpoint.
First, I must point out that being the owner of 2 Ioniq PHEVs you are simply incorrect when you suggest that it will get anywhere near 55 or 60 mpg in hybrid mode. Bring a briefcase full of U S $$ and we will make a bet and go for a drive. I will set my adaptive cruise control at 75 mph (the legal speed in most states and perfectly acceptable in the states with 70 mph limits and 3 states have 80 mph speed limits). We will drive through 2 or three tanks of gas, from Davenport, Iowa to Salt Lake City, Utah in hybrid mode only and the average mpg will NOT, I repeat, NOT reach 50 mpg. You are correct however in the other point. In many cases it is simply a wash or slightly worse. In cases where you can charge in 5th gear on a controlled access highway then exit to a parallel 2 lane and use the EV at lower speeds you can easily get 35 or 36 miles on the EV charge then return to the Interstate for high speed 5th gear recharging. Continuing this kind of cycle will yield more overall range from 11.4 gallons of gas. There are many many places like this in North America.
But this whole discussion has gone totally off the rails regarding my reasons for reporting some of my findings originally. So please allow me to reiterate what my original point was.
1. Most people seem to take the Ioniq on a long trip and drive 30 miles or so on EV, then allow the default switch to hybrid and get another 560 miles or so. (If you stay under 70 mph).
2. I merely presented a second choice whereby you can travel about the same distance but drive about 200 electric miles and about 360 gas miles.
3. Controlling what you do allows for passing through cities, construction, traffic jams and such in all electric mode thereby making you more environmentally friendly and responsible.
4. The price of regular unleaded fuel at the Flying J at the off ramp of I 80 in Gretna, Nebraska today is $1.90 per US gallon. If I use 4 tenths of a gallon more over 54 minutes while recharging in sport mode than I would in hybrid mode and I have termed this 78 cents insignificant, I sure can’t fathom all the intense criticism I have taken in the last 3 days. C’mon, really, 78 or 80 cents to give me the pleasure of driving another 1/2 hour of all electric?? Can you stop at a level 2 charging spot for 2+ hours to recharge 8.9 kwhrs for 78 cents?? And I didn’t have to stop!!
5. The above are simple facts but now I will just speculate. On a long trip across the continent, it is good or bad to have your ICE drive shut down every hour or two for a half hour of EV propulsion?
Will presenting a vehicle for trade or resale be more or less attractive if at least 35 or 40% of it’s total miles have been achieved on all electric driving? During long term or short term ownership, is the vehicle likely to require more or less repairs to the ICE portion of the vehicle if it has only 50 or 60 % of it’s total miles on the ICE drive?? As to the electric drive miles, any basic Tesla fan boy, cult member will personally guarantee that nothing ever will go wrong or wear out to any part of electric drive trains!
So if anyone really takes the time to read the above, I would welcome comments or constructive criticism but please spare me the nit picking BS. I know my numbers and facts with over 50,000 miles in every terrain, speed and weather driving 2 Ioniq PHEV Ultimate models. And I have not even yet touched on the DAS (auto pilot) system in the 2020 model or how to properly use the new 4th driving mode on the 2020.
 
21 - 40 of 47 Posts
Top