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It's just over a month since I traded my Ford Focus Estate for a 2020 Ioniq Plug-In Premium SE. Here are some first impressions that might interest anyone thinking of a similar move. Overall, there is a lot to like, but there have been some disappointments too; let's get those out of the way first.

1) The Hyundai website told me that a Shale Leather interior was an option at no extra cost, and I liked the look of it. But no cars with this interior are actually being sold - it's Dark Grey or nothing. Never mind. Dark Grey turns out not to be as gloomy as it sounds, and my cabin is a perfectly pleasant place to be.
2) The Hyundai website also makes a big selling point of "The stylish and intricate alloy wheels [which] are aerodynamically sculpted to minimize air turbulence and deliver optimal fuel economy." They do look great; only problem is that Hyundai don't put them on the cars they actually deliver. The ones you get look fairly downmarket by comparison. Sorry, Hyundai, but you get a BLACK MARK for that.
3) I drive about 10 miles most days, with occasional longer trips. So with a 39 mile electric range, I thought I could do most of my driving without burning fuel. No. Not in winter, at least, because the heating and ventilation need the engine to run a lot of the time, even when the car is being pushed along electrically. I'm not giving black marks here, though. The hybrid design obviously involves compromises, and I can't expect it to be tailored exactly to my circumstances. Fuel economy still looks pretty good, but time will tell.

OK, so what's good? Just about everything else! Colourwise, I took a risk on the new Electric Shadow, though it's hard to tell from photos on the web just what it looks like in reality. I hoped for something distinctive but understated, and am well pleased with what I got. In a dull light, it's more or less grey, but there is a hint of greenish blue that I find very pleasing, especially in a decent light. And the new front end styling is a great improvement to my eye (not that I want to undermine anyone's affection for the older version).

Electric driving, which I hadn't experienced before, is quiet and smooth, though inevitably some road and wind noise is apparent at higher speeds. Even when the engine kicks in, it is reasonably unobtrusive, and the transition is smooth. I had worried that with the weight of engine, motor and batteries the Plug-in might be underpowered, but I have found no problem at all (though admittedly I am not a particularly sporty driver). And I do love the regenerative braking. Advise me to get a life if you like, but it is hugely satisfying to know that I am recovering energy rather than wearing out brake pads! I worry a little about whether the brake lights come on when I do this though. Can anyone help me out here?

I have a smartphone, a tablet and a laptop, and I was sceptical about whether I needed another pc-like screen sticking up from my dashboard, notwithstanding that several manufacturers are moving that way. I have been pretty much won over, though. The navigation map is bright and sharp, the view from the rear camera is not quite high-definition, but perfectly usable, and although the touchscreen response is sometimes a little slow, this is not a significant problem. Controls for the climate system audio and so on are almost all touch-sensitive virtual buttons rather than mechanical ones. I have seen reviews that complain about this, but everything works fine, and to me it makes for an appealing, clean design. There are a host of driving aids, which will be more useful to some folks than to others. To me, the lane-following system is of doubtful value, for example, but I love the fact that the wing mirrors automatically dip when I go into reverse, so I can actually see the parking space I'm aiming for!

By and large, then, I am loving this car! SHAME ABOUT THE WHEELS, THOUGH.
 

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Hi there.

I have had my PHEV for a year and can offer the following thoughts...

Heating... it is my only frustration that if I need the heating on, the engine starts. If it is not too cold I often just use the heated seats / steering wheel and only switch the ventilation on for a few seconds at a time to clear the misting when needed. If you set the temperature on 'LO' it doesn't start the engine.

Also, this is only for a short part of the year anyway. In the summer, the AC runs 'all electric'.

Brake Lights... in my opinion Hyundai have this right and they come on when they should come on. The best way to see for yourself when they are on / not on would be to watch in the mirror for the red reflection when driving at night. This way you can get a feel for how hard / soft you can be on the brake pedal for them to light up / not light up.

All in all I find the PHEV a great car, and since my daily trip is also well within the EV range have driven mostly electric for the ca. 8000 miles. (I have filled it up only four or five times - mostly half filling it each time, mainly when I have taken it on long journeys).

I love the electric driving so much that I have now taken the leap and ordered a Kona Electric (nothing wrong with the PHEV, just now want to go full electric for no really good reason!)
 

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2) The Hyundai website also makes a big selling point of "The stylish and intricate alloy wheels [which] are aerodynamically sculpted to minimize air turbulence and deliver optimal fuel economy." They do look great; only problem is that Hyundai don't put them on the cars they actually deliver. The ones you get look fairly downmarket by comparison. Sorry, Hyundai, but you get a BLACK MARK for that.
That's strange. All the new Ioniqs at my local dealer come with exactly the same rims as pictured at the Hyundai website.

Note, though, that the rims differ depending on your drive-train. The plug-in doesn't have the same rims as the electric. I haven't seen any 2020 HEV's in real life yet.

Can you post a picture of what your wheels actually look like?
 

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I love the electric driving so much that I have now taken the leap and ordered a Kona Electric (nothing wrong with the PHEV, just now want to go full electric for no really good reason!)
Yes, driving on electricity really grows on you, doesn't it? After driving a PHEV for almost a year and a half, I switched to an Ioniq electric, and I couldn't be happier! :)
 

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My commute is 5 miles/10 miles 16km return. Since the car won't warm up in that time anyway i use the heated seats and steering wheel. I do a couple of longer journeys per month so my cumulative fuel consumption for a year/10,000 miles is 243mpg or 0.97/100km. I tend to use the ICE when there are passengers in the car to keep them warm otherwise the consumption would be even lower. I would go pure EV but my company is not enlightened enough to pay an ev mileage rate yet!!
 

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Electric driving, which I hadn't experienced before, is quiet and smooth, though inevitably some road and wind noise is apparent at higher speeds. Even when the engine kicks in, it is reasonably unobtrusive, and the transition is smooth. I had worried that with the weight of engine, motor and batteries the Plug-in might be underpowered, but I have found no problem at all (though admittedly I am not a particularly sporty driver). And I do love the regenerative braking. Advise me to get a life if you like, but it is hugely satisfying to know that I am recovering energy rather than wearing out brake pads! I worry a little about whether the brake lights come on when I do this though. Can anyone help me out here?
Glad its not just me getting excited about regenerative braking! I love it, especially having different levels!

On the subject of brake lights coming on with regenerative braking, I have checked the reflection on road signs through the rear view mirror at night and they do not come on at any level, they only come on with pressing the brake paddle, someone might add to this, it was my biggest worry that car behind me might think I am braking like mad!!
 

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3) I drive about 10 miles most days, with occasional longer trips. So with a 39 mile electric range, I thought I could do most of my driving without burning fuel. No. Not in winter, at least, because the heating and ventilation need the engine to run a lot of the time, even when the car is being pushed along electrically. I'm not giving black marks here, though. The hybrid design obviously involves compromises, and I can't expect it to be tailored exactly to my circumstances. Fuel economy still looks pretty good, but time will tell.
Like the other posters I use the electric heating of seats and steering wheel especially if I am on my own. If I was going on a longer journey and it was cold I might switch to hybrid mode immediately to get the engine and cabin up to temperature quickly but that is rarely necessary. You should find that the electric range improves as it gets warmer and the car has covered more miles. (Don't ignore sport mode completely it can be useful for joining fast roads or giving it a bit of oomph on a hill. Try it out on a quiet bit of road first if you like as it is a bit lively).
 

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With a Ioniq PHEV, in winter, going alone for a within EV range trip, is special case for saving fuel: Keeps clothes, turn on steering whell and seat heating, turn off climate. If some condensation, turn on front defrost for a few seconds, then off.
Opposite, if planning to go more than EV range, may be start with HEV mode, save EV range to later when car is comfortable (but don't forget it, always use all charge before reaching charger again).

The possibility t heat air by electricity (inverter) is something the PHEV lacks. It also lacks electric defroster for wind screen and preheating. All would come handy, especially for short trips in winter. But such things are costly, also compared to using a little fuel to gain the same.

Oh, driving electric, both the near immediate response and the silence of it, points me to the all electric future (next car).
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That's strange. All the new Ioniqs at my local dealer come with exactly the same rims as pictured at the Hyundai website.

Note, though, that the rims differ depending on your drive-train. The plug-in doesn't have the same rims as the electric. I haven't seen any 2020 HEV's in real life yet.

Can you post a picture of what your wheels actually look like?
Yes. Here are the advertised wheels:
31548

also seen fitted to ptototype cars::
31549

and the ones on my car:
31550

These are specifically the PHEV wheels. I have seen a few 2020 HEVs, and they seem to have wheels identical to those advertised - but of course I paid less attention. I have yet to see a pure electric Ioniq on the road.
 

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Yes. Here are the advertised wheels:

also seen fitted to ptototype cars::

and the ones on my car:

These are specifically the PHEV wheels. I have seen a few 2020 HEVs, and they seem to have wheels identical to those advertised - but of course I paid less attention. I have yet to see a pure electric Ioniq on the road.
Aha. I might be mistaken then. Your rims are of a very similar design, but not exactly as the ones advertised. It's possible that the cars I've seen at the dealer's showroom have rims identical to yours.

I'll take a closer look the next time I visit the local dealer.
 

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As an example there is a journey I make fairly often of around 30 miles with myself and my wife. We rarely have the A/C on and the journey is usually all electric with sometimes say 6 miles reduction of petrol range and a fairly similar overall reduction in overall range, ie total mileage 30 miles total range reduction 36 miles. Outside temperature about 8-10 degrees C.

Today I repeated the journey in similar temperature but we took an old lady out for her birthday so there was one extra passenger. The journey was 9 miles longer at 39 miles, the A/C was on at 20.5 the whole time and there was no manual control of the HEV setting. All of the electricity was used and the petrol range had decreased by 17 miles more than the journey would suggest. Therefore at a very rough guess the extra passenger and full use of the A/C had cost about 12 miles of petrol.
 

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3) I drive about 10 miles most days, with occasional longer trips. So with a 39 mile electric range, I thought I could do most of my driving without burning fuel. No. Not in winter, at least, because the heating and ventilation need the engine to run a lot of the time, even when the car is being pushed along electrically. I'm not giving black marks here, though. The hybrid design obviously involves compromises, and I can't expect it to be tailored exactly to my circumstances. Fuel economy still looks pretty good, but time will tell.
I'm considering a Ioniq Plug-in, as it has the reassuring extra miles through the ICE.
Driving from home with no sound is a dream of mine.

So, has anyone used the mobile app to preheat the car before taking off?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm considering a Ioniq Plug-in, as it has the reassuring extra miles through the ICE.
Driving from home with no sound is a dream of mine.

So, has anyone used the mobile app to preheat the car before taking off?
No. The app doesn't give me that option. And I don't think it would work, because the heating doesn't function without the engine running. Maybe with the pure electric version . . . ? The heated seat gets you warm fairly quickly, though.
 

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I'm considering a Ioniq Plug-in, as it has the reassuring extra miles through the ICE.
Driving from home with no sound is a dream of mine.

So, has anyone used the mobile app to preheat the car before taking off?
You would be defeating reason of buying PHEV vehicle with preheating it. Ioniq has no heath-pump thus to worm up cabin has to run ICE. If you want to run ICE for 10 minutes so you do not suffer 2-3 minutes of riding in cold car until seat is heated up or until ICE is warm enough WHILE MOVING your car, you are considering wrong kind of vehicle.
For 40 years driving in Canada I NEVER had a need to worm up (or cool down) car before driving it. NEVER. Even before heated seats (or A/C) are invented.
 

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You would be defeating reason of buying PHEV vehicle with preheating it. Ioniq has no heath-pump thus to worm up cabin has to run ICE. If you want to run ICE for 10 minutes so you do not suffer 2-3 minutes of riding in cold car until seat is heated up or until ICE is warm enough WHILE MOVING your car, you are considering wrong kind of vehicle.
For 40 years driving in Canada I NEVER had a need to worm up (or cool down) car before driving it. NEVER. Even before heated seats (or A/C) are invented.
That hasn't sunk in yet. The only heating is the ICE, so no preheat :-(
So an EV would be more suitable.
It's a shame Hyundai doesn't use the electric heating from the EV.
 
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