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Jeez I hope you get a resolution to this soon. This is one of my concerns of being an early(ish) adopter - lack of knowledge and experience when something goes wrong. Mine has started making a noise in the last week or so. It sounds to me like a wheel bearing. Under acceleration when turning left, I get a wub-wub-wub-wub sound. I don't get the noise when turning right, which is partly what made me thing wheel bearing. It's going in next week to be checked. I hope it only is a wheel bearing. I've done 17,000km in it.
 

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Jeez I hope you get a resolution to this soon. This is one of my concerns of being an early(ish) adopter - lack of knowledge and experience when something goes wrong. Mine has started making a noise in the last week or so. It sounds to me like a wheel bearing. Under acceleration when turning left, I get a wub-wub-wub-wub sound. I don't get the noise when turning right, which is partly what made me thing wheel bearing. It's going in next week to be checked. I hope it only is a wheel bearing. I've done 17,000km in it.
Could be a CV joint on one side that is worn out.....certainly worth checking.
 

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my car is starting to make the same noise. 2019 Ioniq with about 45K miles. What is the best way to get this fixed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
Sorry Joshua you are asking the wrong guy :). The problem is even though the issue seems to be more common in Konas and eNiros that there is no equivalent TSB for the dealer to follow so they are always asking Hyundai Technical in South Korea for what to do and they appear to be not the most responsive.

If you are still under warranty. Go to you dealer a get them to look at it properly. Say there is at least my car they should know about and I'll post the eNiro TSB that details how to find the fault in both the motor and the reduction gear.

*edit
Link to Kia eNiro TSB
 

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Could be a CV joint on one side that is worn out.....certainly worth checking.
I got in to the dealer today (after a fair bit of negotiation it has to be said) and a mechanic took it for a spin and heard the noise but didn't think it was anything serious. He put it up on the ramp and said the only thing he could see was some uneven tyre wear, and recommended an alignment and rotation. So I'll do that next week and see what happens.
 

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I got in to the dealer today (after a fair bit of negotiation it has to be said) and a mechanic took it for a spin and heard the noise but didn't think it was anything serious. He put it up on the ramp and said the only thing he could see was some uneven tyre wear, and recommended an alignment and rotation. So I'll do that next week and see what happens.
I got in to the dealer today (after a fair bit of negotiation it has to be said) and a mechanic took it for a spin and heard the noise but didn't think it was anything serious. He put it up on the ramp and said the only thing he could see was some uneven tyre wear, and recommended an alignment and rotation. So I'll do that next week and see what happens.
[/QUOTE

Uneven tyre wear is usually caused by a problem with the suspension or steering systems e.g. ball joints or bushes worn. Tracking and hence uneven tyre wear doesn't go out of alignment without there being the afore mentioned issues or the car has had an accident. Worth thoroughly checking.
 

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Say there is at least my car they should know about and I'll post the eNiro TSB that details how to find the fault in both the motor and the reduction gear.

*edit
Link to Kia eNiro TSB
Great post, and I love that the TSB includes video samples that exhibit the noise. The motor noise sample video actually appears to be from an Ioniq!
 

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I can only offer an explanation of what I think is going on from what I've learned studying this issue over the past 2 years after many similar reports from fellow Kona owners. I'll try to keep it as short as I can and I don't really have an easy solution other than perseverance.

Basically, Hyundai have somewhat designed themselves into a corner by using a splined interface between the independently-designed and sealed motor and gear reducer units, without providing any obvious way to tolerate minor misalignment when the units are assembled together.

In each of the motor or reducer units the shafts are fully and rigidly supported by a pair of ball-bearings. A splined connection in theory acts like a single shaft when under torque. If there is a misalignment between the the two sides the spline will wear abnormally and the nearby bearings will experience a higher loading. Conversely, if the shafts are perfectly aligned one of the two bearings either side of the spline may experience insufficient loading to keep the outer race from spinning freely and wear the aluminium housing. The bearings are not a press-fit in the housing, just the shaft.

In mechanical design this situation is called "geometric overconstraint" and it's something you don't do consciously without fully understanding the implications. The only other common EV I'm aware of that does this is the Nissan Leaf and they could have only done it successfully by ensuring both sides are manufactured with high precision. However, splined connections with overconstraint are not too uncommon in heavy industry where tolerances are a bit looser.

Further to this situation, there is anecdotal evidence (the Kia TSB) that there is excessive flex happening between the two parts. A comment from a person on Reddit indicates that the Kona reducer was redesigned from 2020 model. We do know that newer reducers are marked "TRANSYS" and there have been far fewer reports of knocking noises recently.

Many early Kona owners have had this "clicking" or noise issue and the end resolution has nearly always been replacement of both parts. Many more owners have had no problem at all, presumably because of nothing more than dumb luck - the matchup happened to be acceptably precise. A few owners have had one or both parts replaced and the noise came back.

In some cases there has been what appears to be electrical or magnetic noise but I suspect that's an unrelated issue to the clicking or howling.

Most other EV motor/gearbox designs are more clever with the motor being partly or fully integrated into the reducer. Tesla, GM and even it seems now the Ioniq 5. Instead of two bearings each on the motor and reducer halves, there are three in total. In the case of the GM Bolt there are only two in total. In future EVs motors will always be integral with the powertrain to avoid these issues.

Photos for interest. Here's a partly worn spline on a Kona motor. Note the locating diameter with an O-ring to keep gear oil or grease from entering the motor. Also note the conductive brushes to drain off eddy currents. I believe the motor is located to the gearbox by two hollow dowel pins rather than the round spigot seen here. Credit to the Russian teardown video for this screenshot and the next.
Tire Wheel Land vehicle Vehicle Motor vehicle


The hollow gearbox primary shaft with the matching side of the splined connection and bearing. Note the parking pawl wheel.
Automotive tire Rim Automotive wheel system Automotive exhaust Gas


A rough sketch of the bearing arrangement between the reducer pinion and motor shafts.
Handwriting Rectangle Font Parallel Writing
 

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thank you for this explanation... very helpful. Since hyundai is not issuing TSB, is Ioniq a long term car to keep? When will it break or stop working? My car is currently at 46K miles, been to 2 hyundai dealership for this issue, and both says normal.
 

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... is Ioniq a long term car to keep? When will it break or stop working? My car is currently at 46K miles, been to 2 hyundai dealership for this issue, and both says normal.
I don't think anyone can predict what will happen but an Ioniq owner local to me had the gear reducer fail at about 75,000 km. Hyundai paid for the parts only, out of warranty.
Since you already have a noise but it still runs I'd lean towards moving on if you're out of warranty. If your car was quiet, as my Kona is, I'd suggest that it's just fine for the long term.
But it seems that the Ioniq has a motor bearing issue not present in the Kona/Niro that I wasn't previously aware of so maybe others can chime in.
 

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Great post @KiwiME! If you read the TSB that somebody linked about taking apart and reassembling these, they have the tech do it vertically. That is most likely to eliminate any side loading on the shafts as the two units are bolted back together. It definitely seems like a recipe for an interference fit.
 
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That is ridiculous. I would have thought Hyundai would have ironed out the faults from the first generation. Hyundai likes to cut corners, I am learning this as things happen. I may not go with them again for my next vehicle.
 

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I'm not likely to either but in any case I'm stuck with the Kona because it's under the battery recall. I can't sell it for its normal value and it's limited to 90% SoC. I don't expect to receive a new battery for at least another year and there is no other compensation for NZ owners.

But having said that, the car drives perfectly at 20,000 km with my dual overhead magnetic drain plugs fitted and I think battery deterioration is probably relatively low for being 3+ years old. The only other EVs I'd consider are the Peugeot E-208 / E-2008 or the Mini. I can't warm to the Model 3 even though it's priced quite reasonably here.

I visited this BP station today to test their new DC charger. Petrol is about NZ$2.60 / litre yet the charging is free, at least until they figure out how to do the billing.
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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Letter handed to the dealer today outlining I would like it fixed by a certain date otherwise I will exercise my rights under Australian Consumer law. The dealer was pretty good about it and agreed the wait times are not good enough. I'll wait to here their response.

I dont really want a refund as wait times for all EVs in Australia are stretching to 6 months and we be left with our old banger that has no air con. Also 20 months of finance payments down the toilet.
 
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