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To be honest, I'm with Clarkson on this one.
I mean, I understand testing some Ferraris or Bugattis on Nurburgring, but small SUVs? What for?
If they wanna test suspension, bring the car to Polish roads - I guarantee no track will test it as much as our secondary roads, potholes and whatnot. Value of such research would outclass any -ring.
 

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New Hyundai Kona Small Crossover, This Is It!

uncovered pictures of the Kona

now will this be one of the models to get a hybrid / EV drive train, as Hyundai / kia are supposed to be launching 20+ hybrid / EV models in the next 3-5 years (would make sense as easier to include in a new design as easier than trying to retrofit hybrid / EV drive train into existing design)

would an hybrid or EV of this interest people more than std ICE?
 

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Hyundai Kona Electric SUV to Have 217-Mile Range and $39,000 Price Tag

Even though it looked as though Hyundai was going down the hydrogen fuel cell route in the global quest for alternative propulsion systems that's running wild in the automaking industry, it has made a strong claim in the field of battery-powered vehicles as well

When read off the brochure, the specs of the Hyundai Ioniq Electric appear to be quite underwhelming. The EV has a 28 kWh battery pack and an 88 kW electric motor that work together for a maximum zero emissions range of just 124-miles (200 km), according to EPA.

What sets the Ioniq Electric apart, though, is that these apparently modest numbers are actually enough to make the Hyundai the most efficient electric vehicle on the market. And when it comes to EVs, efficiency isn't just one of those numbers you have to throw in there because the authorities asked: buyers actually care about it.

And Hyundai isn't stopping here. Ahn Byung-ki, Hyundai's eco-vehicle performance group director, said that "124 is not enough, and we have a plan to extend that to more than 200 by 2018." While the Kona crossover is slated for a 2017 debut, its electric version should come one year later. Connecting the dots has neve been easier.

The German print magazine Autobild goes one step further and also claims to know the approximate price the future Kona Electric will have: €35,000, which translates to roughly $39,000. For an electric SUV (albeit a small one) with an EPA-rated range of over 200 miles, that's quite attractive. Bear in mind the Chevrolet Bolt is $37,500 before incentives, and Korean models tend to have plenty equipment as standard.

The German journalists say the battery pack will have a capacity of over 50 kWh, which is ambiguous enough to sound like nothing more than a guess - no matter how efficient the Hyundai electric powertrain is, a car that size can't get 200+ miles of range out of a battery smaller than that.

The Hyundai Kona Electric will be joined by its sibling from Kia, the Niro Electric, which should share the same powertrain. Both cars are expected to break cover sometime during next year, fulfilling Ahn Byung-ki's prophecy for 2018 as long as they nail the EPA 200-mile range.
 

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@bluecar1, just shows the imperative is to screw electrickery into any and all platforms, not derive new solutions to old problems.

The notion of a mini SUV with a hybrid powertrain but the aerodynamics of a house brick and the weight of a small lorry is about as appealing as herpes... :eek:
 

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Hahaha, oh SEvans, you crack me up so much! :D
Love your posts.

I wonder what the future 15 years from here will be.
I sure see myself in one of those hybrid SUVs when my back is no longer so tolerant of car height. The way my parents already start to appreciate taller cars.
I guess when I'm that age, aerodynamics and MPG will be a secondary matter, while comfort of getting in and out being the primary.
So I think Kona Hybrid/EV will find their buyers :)
 

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I've reached that age and the Ioniq is no more difficult to get out of than my previous SUV. Other than banging my head on the roof if I get out too quickly ;)
 

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I love the idea of a low SCx, low center of gravity car like the Ioniq. But guys, we are in the minority. In France the Kia Niro far outsells the Hyundai Ioniq. So of course Hyundai-Kia wants to put more small electrified SUVs on the market: they know firsthand it works.
 

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They are dedicated followers of fashion, more like. The platform compromises inherent in 100% of operation do not compensate for the 1% of the time when an SUV might be `superior.` There is an impression of safety that is not borne out by crash testing; handling is compromised; aerodynamics are necessarily inferior; braking is affected, comfort is less in anything other than slow speed in straight line due to excessive body roll and weight transfer.
And lets be honest, most SUV's have the offroad capability of a blancmange, so their price compromise kills even more of the so-called `performance`.

Mummys love them because they keep Little Jimmy safe on the school run - a total false assessment any reasoned amount of research will confirm: Larger, heavy vehicle hits equally large, heavy vehicle the impact forces are still greater - basic physics. Large, top-heavy vehicle is more likely to roll, more likely to suffer secondary impact from being underrun, more likely to have the accident in the first place as it can't stop or manoeuvre as quick. Primary and Secondary safety both compromised. But that has nothing to do with the pattern of sale, or public demand, which is based on perception, not fact...

If cars were made smaller and lighter, forces are commensurately less and protection is easier to provide with fewer compromises for the driving experience. Lighter cars stop faster. The only positive `safety` aspect of an SUV is that it gives clear indication the person driving it is stupid and should be given a wide berth. Exactly the same as it used to be for Volvo drivers before they stopped building tanks.

Oh, and as for the comment previously about getting in and out - self-elevating seats? Works in old folks homes...
 

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Back to subject - I'm interested to see what MPG Kona will get, if there is a hybrid version which I doubt there won't be.
Surely worse than Ioniq, question is - how much worse?
 

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Back to subject - I'm interested to see what MPG Kona will get, if there is a hybrid version which I doubt there won't be.
Surely worse than Ioniq, question is - how much worse?
You can have an idea with the Kia Niro. The Kia Niro and Ioniq Hybrid have the exact same powertrain. If there is a hybrid version of the Kona, it should be something like a Kia Niro with a Hyundai badge.

Ioniq Hybrid vs. Niro

SCx 0,52 vs. 0,68
Rim Ø (inches) 15-17 vs. 16-18
Weight (kg) 1445 vs. 1500
MPG UK
(Fuelly average) 63 vs. 58

The weight is not that different. It's the SCx and wheel size that account for the MPG difference.
 

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You can have an idea with the Kia Niro. The Kia Niro and Ioniq Hybrid have the exact same powertrain. If there is a hybrid version of the Kona, it should be something like a Kia Niro with a Hyundai badge.

Ioniq Hybrid vs. Niro

SCx 0,52 vs. 0,68
Rim Ø (inches) 15-17 vs. 16-18
Weight (kg) 1445 vs. 1500
MPG UK
(Fuelly average) 63 vs. 58

The weight is not that different. It's the SCx and wheel size that account for the MPG difference.
and the Niro has the aero of a brick :) :) cd 0.28 as opposed to cd 0.24 for the Ioniq
 

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Sorry I realize I forgot to translate "SCx" into English. "SCx" is French for CdA, i.e. drag area. So it includes the Cd, which is only one factor. Even if the drag coefficient (Cd) of the Ioniq and Niro/Kona were the same, an SUV has a larger frontal area (A) than a hatchback, so the Ioniq would still have a lower drag area.

The Ioniq has a drag coefficient of 0.23 and a frontal area of 2.26 m2.

The Niro has a drag coefficient of 0.28 and a frontal area of 2.43 m2.

Hence the drag area (CdA) of 0.52 m2 for the Ioniq vs. 0.68 m2 for the Niro.
 
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