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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
so in nearly 4 years of ownership i have never had a flat battery on my ioniq HEV

this morning, walked out near the car mirrors were out, strange !!

push button on door a feeble clunk as it tried to unlock, then nothing :(

the feared flat battery, let the fun challenge begin to get in the car and put the battery on charge

so process is fun, see below

tools you will need
  • small screwdriver to get access to lock for mechanical key
  • knife or similar to open rear hatch using the slot for emergency opening
how to do it :)
  1. push small silver button on key fob to release the mechanical key
  2. on the drivers door underneath the small bit that don't move when you pull the door handle out there is a little slot,
  3. pull the door handle out as though opening door, while pushing the mechanical key or small screw driver in the the slot and with a third hand pull the plastic cover upward (yes you seem to need three hands)
  4. once the cover is off you can use the mechanical key to get in the drivers door (you can't unlock any other door even from the inside of the car :()
  5. push the back of the drivers seat as far down as possible (it will go nearly flat, and remember to push the headrest down)
  6. you can now get in the car to pull the left half of the rear seat forward (you may have to raise the drivers seat up a little to let it lay flat)
  7. you now have access to the boot / trunk (goal is in sight)
  8. you now need a knife from the cutlery drawer or a small paint scraper (something with a blade no more than 1-2mm thick and 10-15mm wide) put it in the slot in the rear hatch just above the lock and slide it to the right, this releases the hatch and and you need to raise it and either open it fully or put something like a wooden spoon in the gap or the hatch lid will drop onto the safety latch and you wont be able to lift it from outside
  9. get back out the car and open the hatch lid, looking from the rear you have the battery cover on the right hand side in the boot, twist the latch and you can open the cover and get access to charge the battery
  10. once you start charging the battery the horn will keep beeping for the a alarm, push the unlock button on the key fob to stop it
  11. lastly get the large beverage you now deserve after beating the car into submission and managing to start charging the battery :)
now battery is on charge, will leave it a few hours and see if the battery is charging or if i have a norwegian blue (see monty python parrot sketch) in the boot instead of a battery

TIP, before putting battery on charge, disconnect the earth / battery negative or the car will consume all the power you put into the battery and the battery will appear not to charge
 

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I think the normal lifespan of a battery in cars with alternators is 4 to 5 years, with 6 years being exceptional in modern cars (perhaps not so exceptional in pre 1980 cars). With so many reports of PHEV and BEV batteries failing within 2 to 3 years, you have done really well!
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
about 2 hours of charging and it don't seem to have got off the bottom, so i may be looking at a dead battery

just been out, stopped the charge and linked the battery back up and the car started and everything worked so may be ok :)
 

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I believe there's also a post under the hood/bonnet that you can connect to for boosting the 12V, so you don't have to dig your way back to the manual hatch release.
 

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There is such a post in my 2018 US model HEV. Of course, no battery in the boot so it needs something.
 

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Hi
I had flat 12 volt battery on my 38kw Ioniq in May.
On the new 38kw the battery is under the bonnet.
My old PHEV had 12 volt battery in back.
The new 38kw has lot more things to make battery go flat.
32428
IMG_2381.JPG
 

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Happened to my 9 week old car 2 weeks ago,phoned Hyundai service a guy came out and opened the car and jumped started it,drove t the dealer who cant find any fault and was told to buy a jump starter and keep it in the car.Loaded the car up and drove 300km got home and car would not lock,had to connect it to the charger before it would lock.Drove it to the dealers next day and once again they cant find any fault asked if they could keep the car for a couple of days for tests and if I could have a courtesy car,this was refused because I had driven the car to the dealer so it didnt count as a break down.Asked if they could put a new battery in the car to find out if it was my battery that was at fault but was told no they dont do that plus they never had a battery in stock..So car goes in on Thursday for tests asked if they could order a battery in case myine was faulty and was again refused,so much for service,I must remind you this car is 9 weeks old and done 2000km.
 

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i thought that was the plugin, i checked my manual and there was no mention of the post under the bonnet / hood, as that was the first thing i thought of
Pages 6-4 to 6-7 in the Owner's Manual, with 6-6 showing an illustration... as I had cause to learn tonight.

My HEV has been parked up for a month (according to my credit card receipt, as that's the last time I went shopping), and I couldn't even get a feeble attempt at a clunk out of it tonight. Thank goodness for YouTube videos one can watch on one's phone while standing like a lemon next to one's car, which explain how to use three hands to get to the emergency lock override.

There's enough residual magic pixie dust to illuminate the starter button when I press it, and to power a blinking red LED at the base of the windscreen (alarm? immobiliser?) but not enough to do anything useful like, y'know, drive the thing. All the interior lights are dead, as is the dash.

I don't have a charger, and the communal parking where I live is too far from my flat to run a cable to the car anyway, not to mention the trip/garotte hazard that doing so would create. It's a company vehicle, so an AA mechanic is due to attend in the morning (I was offered tonight, but I fancy some sleep and there might be real emergencies for them to deal with, so my battery can wait).

Figured I'd hop on here to find out if anyone else had experienced similar issues, what with everyone staying home and barely driving anywhere these days... lo and behold, I stumbled across this thread!
 

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Best of luck in the morning Alex. Once it's had the boost be sure to leave it running for at least 30 minutes to charge the 12V system back up. Longer would be better if you fancy a sightseeing trip.
 
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Took my car in to the workshop on Thursday and was told if they couldnt find any fault I would have to pay the mechanics time for checking the 12 volt battery ,I refused to sign the papers and was told they wouldnt test it unless I signed.After 1.30 hours was told they couldnt find any fault but they werent going to charge me.Was told next time the 12 v was flat not to jump start it but get it towed to the workshop.
 

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Pages 6-4 to 6-7 in the Owner's Manual, with 6-6 showing an illustration... as I had cause to learn tonight.

My HEV has been parked up for a month (according to my credit card receipt, as that's the last time I went shopping), and I couldn't even get a feeble attempt at a clunk out of it tonight. Thank goodness for YouTube videos one can watch on one's phone while standing like a lemon next to one's car, which explain how to use three hands to get to the emergency lock override.

There's enough residual magic pixie dust to illuminate the starter button when I press it, and to power a blinking red LED at the base of the windscreen (alarm? immobiliser?) but not enough to do anything useful like, y'know, drive the thing. All the interior lights are dead, as is the dash.

I don't have a charger, and the communal parking where I live is too far from my flat to run a cable to the car anyway, not to mention the trip/garotte hazard that doing so would create. It's a company vehicle, so an AA mechanic is due to attend in the morning (I was offered tonight, but I fancy some sleep and there might be real emergencies for them to deal with, so my battery can wait).

Figured I'd hop on here to find out if anyone else had experienced similar issues, what with everyone staying home and barely driving anywhere these days... lo and behold, I stumbled across this thread!
The AA chap rocked up this morning with his box of magic pixie dust, and hooked it up to the connector in the fuse box under the bonnet. As soon as he applied power, the car's alarm sounded (so now I finally know what it sounds like, after three years), but he did warn me in advance so I was ready with the key to kill the alarm quickly.

Car started first time, and I have just returned from an hour's drive up and down the M23.
 

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How strange. I guess they must have updated the manual in the intervening months between you getting yours and me getting mine. Good to know. Standards, eh?
 

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Mine died today too . No problems with previous Ioniq . My 2020's just passed 5000 miles so it was a little of a surprise . No problem starting it with the battery recovery button other than removing the fiddly key cover as carefully as I could , though probably woke my neighbours with the horn going off when I started it . Got my wife to work late ( 45 minute round trip ) and haven't put the key cover back yet just in case it's flat when it's time to pick her up
 

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Do you use the car frequently, chunga68? I take ours out once a fortnight or so, for about 10 miles. Then park it in garage with driver's window open (but covered in cloth) so that if necessary I can reach in to press battery button.

Cymro
 

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@ Cymro I normally take the wife to work and back 4 times a week ( 22 mile round trip each time = 8 trips ) . Also done Manchester airport and back twice in the last 2 weeks . So it's not as if it's standing there doing nothing . Normally I do volunteer car ambulance driving ,but that's stopped since March ;)
 
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