Hyundai IONIQ Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!

New member here, made an account to hopefully get some advice on what to do. I recently purchased a 2019 Hyundai Ioniq EV 28kWh. I did pretty well with investments and shortly thereafter I bought myself a Tesla after a wonderful 2 month window with the Ioniq.

My partner has learned how to drive and I want her to drive my Ioniq as her commuter car. After 3 months of being parked at the end of my driveway, I come to find out I can't even open the Ioniq with my fob. I open it with the emergency key and connect the Level 1 Charger that comes with the vehicle. To my surprise, that was not enough for it to be able to turn on. I call my dad in and he helps me jump my 12v battery, which then allows the Ioniq to start charging off the Level 1 charger. I leave it there for a day and return to the same issue. The 12v battery died despite being connected to Level 1.

My dad had voltage readings each time, pre-jump it was below 5. After jump & turning car on it reached 14.1. Returning the next day it was below 5 again. When we jump the battery and turn the car on it remains charged and allows me to drive as much as I want, given I don't shut the car off.

Now fast forward to when I was able to FINALLY get an appointment in at a Hyundai Dealership 8/24. Not sure what they did in there, but I was told a battery would need to be ordered. Unfortunately for me, it seems as though Hyundai's providers for this specific battery won't be able to give me one until DECEMBER 2ND!! This is not ideal, as I am beyond stretched thin and spend about 5 hours a day commuting, where this vehicle would free up more than half of that time if I can get my partner on the road in a safe and reliable car. I chose Hyundai for my first EV purchase because I have only had reliable experiences with my Elantra. Apparently it is under warranty and will be free, but even if there is a cost I will pay it because I am low on time.

What do you all recommend? Should I look into trading the Ioniq in for a better alternative? Will the dealership even take it in this condition? My biggest concern is the 12v battery not being the issue as I have seen in these forums it could very well be a different part of the car causing the issue. I am at my wit's end and it took my to TODAY 9/13 to hear from the service center that I wouldn't get my battery order until December.

Thank you all for any input you may be able to provide. I appreciate the kindness you all share with eachother on these forums.

-Carlos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
The 12V battery is a weak link with a short life due to these cars sitting for months during the original shipping process. I think it's only under the 12 Month warranty as well so you have to buy this expensive battery. Search these forums and find the alternate standard aftermarket battery sizes that will fit in the car and buy from an autoparts store or big box store, or online. Make sure the Aux Battery saver is "enabled" or ON. The level 1 charger has nothing to do with charging the 12V unless "Aux Battery Saver" is enabled and the 12V battery is in good voltage (over 12.6V I think). Yours may be turned off, and turn that on soon.

Finally, make sure you lock the doors with the fob, at all times, that seems to enable the 12V battery saver charging to operate.

I would not look to get rid of the car due to this issue. It's easy to solve and reliable if the 12V battery is good. Mine has the original battery and 18000 miles and two cold winters and sitting in a showroom for 6 months. It has gone dead twice due to me incorrectly not locking the doors or leaving the car "on". Each time I have jumped it, it comes right back. The other cheap option is getting a 12V jump pack (under $50.00) and keep it in the car for emergencies. It does stink to use the emergency key, so a new 12V may be best.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ioniq 28kWh
Joined
·
356 Posts
Hi everyone!

New member here, made an account to hopefully get some advice on what to do. I recently purchased a 2019 Hyundai Ioniq EV 28kWh. I did pretty well with investments and shortly thereafter I bought myself a Tesla after a wonderful 2 month window with the Ioniq.

My partner has learned how to drive and I want her to drive my Ioniq as her commuter car. After 3 months of being parked at the end of my driveway, I come to find out I can't even open the Ioniq with my fob. I open it with the emergency key and connect the Level 1 Charger that comes with the vehicle. To my surprise, that was not enough for it to be able to turn on. I call my dad in and he helps me jump my 12v battery, which then allows the Ioniq to start charging off the Level 1 charger. I leave it there for a day and return to the same issue. The 12v battery died despite being connected to Level 1.

My dad had voltage readings each time, pre-jump it was below 5. After jump & turning car on it reached 14.1. Returning the next day it was below 5 again. When we jump the battery and turn the car on it remains charged and allows me to drive as much as I want, given I don't shut the car off.

Now fast forward to when I was able to FINALLY get an appointment in at a Hyundai Dealership 8/24. Not sure what they did in there, but I was told a battery would need to be ordered. Unfortunately for me, it seems as though Hyundai's providers for this specific battery won't be able to give me one until DECEMBER 2ND!! This is not ideal, as I am beyond stretched thin and spend about 5 hours a day commuting, where this vehicle would free up more than half of that time if I can get my partner on the road in a safe and reliable car. I chose Hyundai for my first EV purchase because I have only had reliable experiences with my Elantra. Apparently it is under warranty and will be free, but even if there is a cost I will pay it because I am low on time.

What do you all recommend? Should I look into trading the Ioniq in for a better alternative? Will the dealership even take it in this condition? My biggest concern is the 12v battery not being the issue as I have seen in these forums it could very well be a different part of the car causing the issue. I am at my wit's end and it took my to TODAY 9/13 to hear from the service center that I wouldn't get my battery order until December.

Thank you all for any input you may be able to provide. I appreciate the kindness you all share with eachother on these forums.

-Carlos
Once 12V battery is drained once its virtually dead. Even if brand new and you forget the lights on over night the battery is dead. So replace the battery (any car part dealer would have a similar battery its not magic) and turn on the battery saver option.

There are an option in the dash display to turn on 12V battery automatic top up or something like that. Available via steering wheel buttons while in park.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The 12V battery is a weak link with a short life due to these cars sitting for months during the original shipping process. I think it's only under the 12 Month warranty as well so you have to buy this expensive battery. Search these forums and find the alternate standard aftermarket battery sizes that will fit in the car and buy from an autoparts store or big box store, or online. Make sure the Aux Battery saver is "enabled" or ON. The level 1 charger has nothing to do with charging the 12V unless "Aux Battery Saver" is enabled and the 12V battery is in good voltage (over 12.6V I think). Yours may be turned off, and turn that on soon.

Finally, make sure you lock the doors with the fob, at all times, that seems to enable the 12V battery saver charging to operate.

I would not look to get rid of the car due to this issue. It's easy to solve and reliable if the 12V battery is good. Mine has the original battery and 18000 miles and two cold winters and sitting in a showroom for 6 months. It has gone dead twice due to me incorrectly not locking the doors or leaving the car "on". Each time I have jumped it, it comes right back. The other cheap option is getting a 12V jump pack (under $50.00) and keep it in the car for emergencies. It does stink to use the emergency key, so a new 12V may be best.

Good luck.
Thank you for the answer. I have been doing some deep digging and can't find any conversation on this forum where the aftermarket battery was talked about. Would you be able to point me in the right direction?
 

·
Registered
2019 Ioniq 28kWh
Joined
·
356 Posts
Thank you for the answer. I have been doing some deep digging and can't find any conversation on this forum where the aftermarket battery was talked about. Would you be able to point me in the right direction?
Why would you need that? I have the same car, it's a standard 12V lead battery available at any car part store. Don't know the name of them at your location but even in small cities over here we got at least 4 different stores with car batteries available in all sizes. It's a standard 12V battery, not magic

google cmf40l-bci, same as a KIA Piccanto 2020 for example
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq EV
Joined
·
37 Posts
Forgive me if you have tried this already, but I don't see it stated in your post. Have you actually tried charging the 12v battery itself (not using the car's High voltage battery to charge it, but an actual battery charger). If you have, and it's not holding charge, then it's time for a new battery. You should be able to get a battery from most automotive stores. If you would prefer to wait until December and use the warranty to cover the battery, then perhaps go out an buy a portable jumper. These only cost about $50-70 and can be as small as a large mobile phone. Then you can jump it to start each time. Then go home and plug it in to recharge. A good one can jump a car start at least a half dozen times before needing to be charged itself (it's like a mobile powerbank for your car instead of your mobile phone). It is a good thing to have in the glove box anyway. It also charges your cellphone and other accessories when they are low on juice.

Many on this forum trickle charge (low amperage) their 12v regularly to keep it topped up. If you do charge your 12v, charging slowly is better and less harmful (less than 4A).
Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Why would you need that? I have the same car, it's a standard 12V lead battery available at any car part store. Don't know the name of them at your location but even in small cities over here we got at least 4 different stores with car batteries available in all sizes. It's a standard 12V battery, not magic

google cmf40l-bci, same as a KIA Piccanto 2020 for example
Where is your battery on your Ioniq? Mine is under the hood, when I last spoke to the Service Manager he said its on backorder because the reverse polarity battery is hard to source materials for currently. Not sure if this changes anything, I will attempt to visit a local shop soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Forgive me if you have tried this already, but I don't see it stated in your post. Have you actually tried charging the 12v battery itself (not using the car's High voltage battery to charge it, but an actual battery charger). If you have, and it's not holding charge, then it's time for a new battery. You should be able to get a battery from most automotive stores. If you would prefer to wait until December and use the warranty to cover the battery, then perhaps go out an buy a portable jumper. These only cost about $50-70 and can be as small as a large mobile phone. Then you can jump it to start each time. Then go home and plug it in to recharge. A good one can jump a car start at least a half dozen times before needing to be charged itself (it's like a mobile powerbank for your car instead of your mobile phone). It is a good thing to have in the glove box anyway. It also charges your cellphone and other accessories when they are low on juice.

Many on this forum trickle charge (low amperage) their 12v regularly to keep it topped up. If you do charge your 12v, charging slowly is better and less harmful (less than 4A).
Good Luck!
Hi! Thanks for the advice, I actually did try charging the battery up with a 10a device my father has. I was considering buying a trickle charger, but it absolutely does not hold charge. I have to keep the battery charging while I turn the car on to even have a chance at the battery holding its charge before turning the whole car on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,473 Posts
The 12V battery is a weak link with a short life due to these cars sitting for months during the original shipping process.
Then this would be a common issue for all imported cars. It is not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,473 Posts
I have the same car, it's a standard 12V lead battery available at any car part store.
Nope, terminals are in different places on non-OEM batteries. You can do some lead modifications, but they can be a hassle. Probably worth it for the much lower price and then you are set if battery fails again. Had to do that on my Honda motorcycle when I replaced the battery despite promises that the 3rd party battery would fit.
 

·
Registered
2020 Ioniq EV
Joined
·
37 Posts
Hi! Thanks for the advice, I actually did try charging the battery up with a 10a device my father has. I was considering buying a trickle charger, but it absolutely does not hold charge. I have to keep the battery charging while I turn the car on to even have a chance at the battery holding its charge before turning the whole car on.
Sounds like it's time for a new battery. Do look into the portable booster. It's a worthwhile back up device and relatively inexpensive. My 12V is also under the hood at the front of the car.

I don't know about this reverse polarity stuff your service dealer is talking about. But it is a 12V battery with a positive and negative terminal. I think the size of this battery might be the real issue as this one is smaller than most, so it may not fit the battery tray. But you can always get a generic battery tray to ensure that the battery is secured to your car.

This video shows the guy altering the battery tray in his car, but I would just bolt in a generic tray instead.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ioniq 28kWh
Joined
·
356 Posts
Nope, terminals are in different places on non-OEM batteries. You can do some lead modifications, but they can be a hassle. Probably worth it for the much lower price and then you are set if battery fails again. Had to do that on my Honda motorcycle when I replaced the battery despite promises that the 3rd party battery would fit.
Over here we got shelves with like 200 different battery sizes shapes and pole locations. Just a random link from google that refers to the exact OEM number. I can not se how it could be wrong.


Look here for actual Ioniq pictures.... same battery layout.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ioniq 28kWh
Joined
·
356 Posts
Where is your battery on your Ioniq? Mine is under the hood, when I last spoke to the Service Manager he said its on backorder because the reverse polarity battery is hard to source materials for currently. Not sure if this changes anything, I will attempt to visit a local shop soon.
Yes, under hood. I have the exact same car as you.

Battery seems to be a Type 54,


All of those would fit unless I'm totally blind

(Any of these OEM numbers will do.
NS40L / NS40ZAL / NS40ZL / NS60L / 28B19L / 34B17/19L / 36B20L / 38B19L / 38B20L / 40B19L / 44B20L / GBA3054/ GLOBAL 54028 / P4025 / EA386 / 054TE / 540 125 033 / A13 / YBX3056 / YBX5056 / SMF056/ CMF40L-BCI)
 

·
Registered
2019 Ioniq 28kWh
Joined
·
356 Posts
Then this would be a common issue for all imported cars. It is not.
Some how electric cars eats 12V batteries. Really strange as they got a superb capability to keep them at the exact charge they need. No cranking etc but they still die like flys. Renault changes 12V battery every 3 year on the service plan for the Zoe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,473 Posts
Well understood why EV 12 volt batteries have short lives. No alternator means no constant charging. Intermittent charging from the traction battery is not good for lead acid batteries.
 

·
Registered
2019 Ioniq 28kWh
Joined
·
356 Posts
Well understood why EV 12 volt batteries have short lives. No alternator means no constant charging. Intermittent charging from the traction battery is not good for lead acid batteries.
You are funny. Please read again. Electric cars have all possibilities ever to do it properly, still they don't. We know very well they don't, still with software they could do it perfect, but no.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
Thank you for the answer. I have been doing some deep digging and can't find any conversation on this forum where the aftermarket battery was talked about. Would you be able to point me in the right direction?
Sorry, For some reason I cannot find a specific one as well but it has been talked about a lot.. I did find Lucas in GB makes and equivalent, but that does not help you here. The battery tray is a lot larger than the actual battery. Find a battery service center for Interstate, Optima or Deka (or other) batteries nearby, bring your car to let them fit something. Even if by Trial and Error. There are many options that will fit with much more capacity than the factory battery. An AGM may last better as well. They may need to fit a new hold down clamp, but that's easy. I would not want to be tied to a Hyundai OEM battery that's over $300 for minimal CCA capacity. If you do accomplish this, let us know what you end up with. There are hundreds of members who would desire this information. If I had a service center near me, I would take mine, but I am in a rural area. The OEM battery is 7.36" Long (It looks like can be 1.25-1.5" longer), 5" wide (It looks like up to 1"-1.5" wider), and 7.83" High. From the front (Terminal side) of the battery, it looks like the Positive is on the Right hand size. This is a photo of my 28 kW battery.

I hate to see you be a test case, but finding an alternative option from a US supplier would be fantastic. I am sure the factory one is small to save weight as weight in an EV is critical. Keep us posted and if I can help, message me. I will have a look locally and review US battery specs.

Hood Motor vehicle Automotive battery Auto part Automotive design
Rectangle Font Slope Parallel Pattern
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
Yes, under hood. I have the exact same car as you.

Battery seems to be a Type 54,


All of those would fit unless I'm totally blind

(Any of these OEM numbers will do.
NS40L / NS40ZAL / NS40ZL / NS60L / 28B19L / 34B17/19L / 36B20L / 38B19L / 38B20L / 40B19L / 44B20L / GBA3054/ GLOBAL 54028 / P4025 / EA386 / 054TE / 540 125 033 / A13 / YBX3056 / YBX5056 / SMF056/ CMF40L-BCI)
Unfortunately, the 54 size battery is not available in the US. I am still looking.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top