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Once you isolate the -ve terminal battery connection from 12V to car's chassis, the 12V is in effect 100% isolated from the car, and the car's own charging whatevers cannot affect it at all. You could equally leave the -ve connected to the chassis, and lift the +ve terminal stuff away. Again that will isolate the 12V 100% from the car.

I use a Ctek MXS 5.0 to desulphate & recondition mine every few months, and simply connecting the 2 leads from that to the battery's terminals does the job. It couldn't care less whether one or other lead post (but NOT both!) happens to be connected to something else.
Ok completed the following test.
1) Disconnected negative car cable from the battery terminal.
2) Measured a voltage of around 12.2v
3) Connected the Optimate 6 battery charger to desulphate/charge battery
-- Charger did not detect sulphation, and after about a few hours showed the battery in good health and was in float maintenance mode (~13.6v for 30 minutes on and off)
4) After about 8 hours, removed charger, and let battery sit isolated for about a day (~18 hours)
-- measured charge of about 12.96 v (which is mainly surface charge)
5) Reconnected negative car cable back to negative terminal on battery
6) Measured voltage on battery, and voltage dropped to 12.4, 12.38, etc
7) Connected clamp ammeter and measured only about a draw of 20 milliamps?
-- Perhaps there was a large draw when I first connected the cable, but to go from 100% to 75%??

Sounds like the battery can't hold its charge above 75%? But then why did the Optimate 6 indicate a good battery? The Optimate is designed to also measure the health of the battery and indicated excellent health at 100%.
I guess I need to do a load test first with the battery isolated to see if it keeps its charge?

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2022 Ioniq 5 AWD LR w. Ultimate (Limited)
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Ours was completely dead - no signs of life.

We left it for 2 days at the PPF/wrap place... they had the doors, windows, tailgate opening and closing multiple times as they worked on the car.

After the second day, it was dead... completely dead. The owner called my wife in a panic. Since we had done a tonne of research, we already knew the problem (and how to fix it),so I grabbed our portable car booster pak. Pretty simple to fix, I attached the alligator clips to the 12V battery, opened the door, and turned on the car, then set it to "Utility Mode". We left the key in the car and left it on for the last hour as they finished up the work.

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Love how it turned out, Xpel full-car satin paint-protection film: Drop Pic(s) of your Ioniq 5

Shout out to "Precision Vehicle Wraps" in Edmonton... if you're in the area, they did a great job on all our cars... they're great to work with and very accommodating and responsive to any questions or changes.
 

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Ok completed the following test.
1) Disconnected negative car cable from the battery terminal.
2) Measured a voltage of around 12.2v
3) Connected the Optimate 6 battery charger to desulphate/charge battery
-- Charger did not detect sulphation, and after about a few hours showed the battery in good health and was in float maintenance mode (~13.6v for 30 minutes on and off)
4) After about 8 hours, removed charger, and let battery sit isolated for about a day (~18 hours)
-- measured charge of about 12.96 v (which is mainly surface charge)
5) Reconnected negative car cable back to negative terminal on battery
6) Measured voltage on battery, and voltage dropped to 12.4, 12.38, etc
7) Connected clamp ammeter and measured only about a draw of 20 milliamps?
-- Perhaps there was a large draw when I first connected the cable, but to go from 100% to 75%??

Sounds like the battery can't hold its charge above 75%? But then why did the Optimate 6 indicate a good battery? The Optimate is designed to also measure the health of the battery and indicated excellent health at 100%.
I guess I need to do a load test first with the battery isolated to see if it keeps its charge?

View attachment 41492
Update: redid the same test as above, as I noted the battery was reading under 12v (11.7v). This time the desulfation mode kicked in. After about 1 day and a half, the Optimate 6 showed green (100%). The battery was about 13.3v. Connected battery back to car, and measured 12.7v. Didn't use car for a couple of days. Measured this morning just before my wife took the car at 12.55v and its 3 celsius outside. So it looks like the battery is finally holding its charge. I will most likely repeat the battery reconditioning in a couple of months to keep the battery in good shape. Most likely, the boat trip, dealer prep, etc may have heavily discharged the battery causing it do desulfate before I got it. This forum is great as I would have never known to check the 12v battery on delivery.
 

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1) I don't know anything about desulfation or trickle charging. But for sure, you don't want to put 22v into the car. A purist electrical engineer may suggest otherwise, but I would strongly recommend disconnecting the + terminal also.
2) Hyundai Global Serviceway. VPN and a bit of money will be required.
Is that site legitimate? Its asking for credit card information. A little leery of providing ... It says you can have access for 24 hours. Does that allow you to download the complete shop repair manual?
 

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Is that site legitimate? Its asking for credit card information. A little leery of providing ... It says you can have access for 24 hours. Does that allow you to download the complete shop repair manual?
Yes. Legit Hyundai site. It will take you a while to figure out how to find stuff. It's huge and has a few different branches. If you're looking for one specific thing, you will be able to find it in a few hours. Downloading is one page at a time. There are thousands of pages. In my case, I paid once just get the lay of the land and figure out how to download pages. Then I made a plan, paid for another day the following weekend and got probably a couple hundred pages that I thought would be useful to projects I have in mind. I have since found that I got most of what I want, but not all. There is a lot of cross-referencing between pages. Sometimes I see a reference to a page I didn't get. Maybe I'll go in again some day to fill in those gaps.

But this is not an easy, just pay, click, and get everything in case you need it some day kind of situation.

I would start with:
  • wiring index - just a few pages and interesting because it shows you what exists
  • component locations - 50 pages of pictures showing where all the modules are in the car
  • schematics 100, 110, 120 and 130, which cover the power distribution. Each one of these has quite a few pages.

Then:
  • additional schematics - there are many, so just pick the ones that sound interesting
  • connector and harness
  • repair procedures - there are a bazzilion of them, most not interesting unless you're working on that specific part of the car.

Hope this helps.
 

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So, new 5 and just installed my battery monitor. And, after my better half has been driving in town this morning, my first read is 12.5V......hmmmm, not happy. This is pretty low for a 12V battery, imo. So, I attach the level 2, and it starts charging. Will take a couple hours to fill the 40 or so miles my honey put on this morning, so the 12V will get some juice as well. Obviously, the car logic is not keeping the 12V happy, again, imo. So, I will monitor the daily use charges to see what is happening, but I am surprised at the 12.5. If the car just hits the battery charge for a brief time, as has been stated above, this will not keep the small one happy....takes some time, given the use of heat, windows, wipers, etc during short drives. Not sure what the solution is, but think that daily charging may be key, and the Tesla note to keep the thing plugged up may be necessary. Also not sure what happens to the 12V charging that IS taking place while charging the main battery after it reaches my pre-set 90%.....will it keep charging the baby or not. Time will tell, but I need to figure this out so the better half does not get stranded by something silly.
 

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.... my first read is 12.5V......hmmmm, not happy. This is pretty low for a 12V battery, imo.
Seems a perfectly normal voltage for a lead acid battery.

A standard cell in a Lead acid battery generates a nominal 2.1V
6 cells per battery = 12.6-12.7V when fully charged
Power from this is constantly being consumed by the cars systems - Alarm systems / Bluelink etc, which although albeit small (c250mA), contribute to a constant current drain on the battery which slowly lowers the voltage over the day before the BMS gives it a regular boost.
When I first connect to my battery monitor and it downloads the data to my phone, this is often accompanied by a low battery warning on the app which you can usually disregard as being perfectly normal
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I am having to adjust my pea brain to a new paradigm, from ICE to EV. My former corvette battery was good if at least at 12.8, and this has also been the case on my small solar batteries. For LiFPo batteries on my solar system, I had to set the float down from recommended high settings to about 26.5 for a 24V battery, so 12.5V is not healthy in my current thinking. However, you are correct that the car may not want to charge until around this number....TBD.
 

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So, when my honey got home, 12V was at 12.5 as noted above. Plugged up level 2 and charging of both began.....12V at over 14V. After just over 2 hours, shut off at my preset 90% charge and the car says over 290 miles....OK. So, I looked at the 12V and guess what, the car decided to begin charging at just over 13V....again hmmm. Opened up and turned on, and the charging shut down and voltage is reading 12.9.....has not settled out, but in the range to keep me happy. May never understand the charging logic....but as long as I can intervene, will be goot.
 

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I am new to the monitor, but yes, when I applied level 2, the 12V charge went over 14V. But surprisingly, after it cut off when the big boy reached 90%, I found it to be charging at just over 13V from the main battery???
 

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2022 Ioniq 5 Ultimate RWD 73kwh
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Hi everyone, this is my first forum post so please be kind :)
I've had my Ioniq 5 for less than 3 weeks and driven just over 500 miles.
Went out to use car yesterday morning after putting it on to charge overnight from 43% to 100% to find the car completely dead!!!
From what I've read on the many posts since relating to my issue it seems that my 12v battery is flat. I'm astounded that this could happen after such a short time with no warning at all.
If the 12v battery is such a critical component I would expect it to be easily monitored in the car or on the bluelink app but I can't find anything. Is the only solution to purchase an aftermarket BM2 monitor and a booster charge pack to be prepared for it happening again???
If that's the case then it seems to me that the car is not fit for purpose as delivered - does anyone else agree?
Is there any co-ordinated complaint sumission to Hyundai that I can join or a known issue fault report that I can follow.
I'm really dissapointed with this as it's my first electric car and I'm already thinking that I should have stuck with a diesel Audi.:mad:
 

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For the former ICE designs, most had a simple generator with a form of regulation, amperage early on, and voltage later when they learned better. And, the job was to simply push energy into the battery at all times, the amount depending on the battery status. They were not smart enough to inform you when the battery began to deteriorate, and of course they often failed and overcharged due to bad logic. In your case, even if you had a parasitic on, the incoming charge would have made it easier to deal with the load. However, I am not smart enough yet to know what kind of DC-DC logic is used on the I5 to maintain the 12V. Is it as simple as the former regulators were, or as some point out, a time setting of some sort that fails when long term loads are present and the car not in utility mode. But, in any case, this should not have happened, and probably cannot be blamed on a parasitic like a dash cam. My pea brain says that either the DC-DC is off on time or voltage when charging, or you have a bad battery that, again, is not sensed by the car and just goes south with no warning. Time will tell whether this charging logic is bad, because we normally do not see a spate of failed batteries on ICE....yes, they will go down hill after 5-7 years....and will provide warning under start loads, esp in cold weather. This design is different, but, since we do not get those indicators with high load, the battery sensor can help. Since the simplest is normally the issue, I am going to bet on a bad battery that can't take a proper charge, or hold onto it. No excuses.
 

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Hi everyone, this is my first forum post so please be kind :)
I've had my Ioniq 5 for less than 3 weeks and driven just over 500 miles.
Went out to use car yesterday morning after putting it on to charge overnight from 43% to 100% to find the car completely dead!!!
From what I've read on the many posts since relating to my issue it seems that my 12v battery is flat. I'm astounded that this could happen after such a short time with no warning at all.
If the 12v battery is such a critical component I would expect it to be easily monitored in the car or on the bluelink app but I can't find anything. Is the only solution to purchase an aftermarket BM2 monitor and a booster charge pack to be prepared for it happening again???
If that's the case then it seems to me that the car is not fit for purpose as delivered - does anyone else agree?
Is there any co-ordinated complaint sumission to Hyundai that I can join or a known issue fault report that I can follow.
I'm really dissapointed with this as it's my first electric car and I'm already thinking that I should have stuck with a diesel Audi.:mad:
As I said on your other post -Rather depends on what caused the fault. There is a fault caused by a defective charge port that causes a constant drain on the 12v and then kills it. I understand there is an update for this fix. Speak to your dealer. A BM2 would allow you to see if the problem exists.
 

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This is a great point that I have not heard, part of why I am on board here, new news, great. HOWEVER, comma, this might be a good point for an ICE vehicle that ONLY can charge when running, esp if it sits for a while. Similar to many of the corvettes that are not used on a daily basis.....and will only survive for about two weeks before the battery is dead, due to simple parasitic from the many ECU's.....the C5 had 11 of them. But, for this vehicle that can conceivably charge the 12V at any time, even when sitting, this is not a very strong point......not sure what the drain from a bad charge port might be, but prob not much. But again, if all well, it should stay ahead of this drain until the main pack were dead.
 

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Seems curious that many 12v failures occurred while charging or scheduled to charge. I also recalled that some failures were charging with level 2 cables Might there be a pattern?
 

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.....not sure what the drain from a bad charge port might be, but prob not much. But again, if all well, it should stay ahead of this drain until the main pack were dead.
It has been measured at between 6 and 9 amps!
 

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2022 Ioniq 5 Cyber Grey Limited
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Hi everyone, this is my first forum post so please be kind :)
I've had my Ioniq 5 for less than 3 weeks and driven just over 500 miles.
Went out to use car yesterday morning after putting it on to charge overnight from 43% to 100% to find the car completely dead!!!
From what I've read on the many posts since relating to my issue it seems that my 12v battery is flat. I'm astounded that this could happen after such a short time with no warning at all.
If the 12v battery is such a critical component I would expect it to be easily monitored in the car or on the bluelink app but I can't find anything. Is the only solution to purchase an aftermarket BM2 monitor and a booster charge pack to be prepared for it happening again???
If that's the case then it seems to me that the car is not fit for purpose as delivered - does anyone else agree?
Is there any co-ordinated complaint sumission to Hyundai that I can join or a known issue fault report that I can follow.
I'm really dissapointed with this as it's my first electric car and I'm already thinking that I should have stuck with a diesel Audi.:mad:
By any chance did you open the charging door with your bluelink app?

There is a know problem doing this. It somehow drains the battery sometimes. Hyundai needs to address the problem as I think it still remains.

I agree there shouldn't be any problems with a new car especially something that many may encounter in normal use. I've never had any problems charging but I have never used the app to open the door and only use the level 1 cord provided with the car for charging. I've had mine since Feb. and have only 3400 miles on it.

So far I use my car as I expect to and have had no problems. I love it every time I go somewhere.
 

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Ah, yes, the door, not a charge port. And, this is equivalent to a couple of normal old style light bulbs, whereas, small alternators put out 40-60amps, and truck units up to a couple hundred. I am not sure what rating the DC converter has, but likely pretty high. Even very small battery chargers are at about 10 amps and they take all day to refresh a low battery. So....I would like to eventually learn how this charge system works with numbers.....likely not for a bit yet. Several light bulbs, as in 10 amps, will drain a normal battery overnight. But, if the DC converter is awake, this ain't going to happen. All good as we share.
 
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